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Baled barley


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He has probably taken it as silage because it was a thin crop.

Looking at the ears on the ground he may also have cut it to give you some pigeon shooting.

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Posted (edited)

Seems mad to silage or cut for hay potentially so close to being ready to harvest - but I suppose last year he didn’t get it cut until September! Why not just plant grass and get a few cuts for silage? 

Obviously I’m pleased that it’s barely and cut badly, but cutting on a Sunday evening when I’m in work all week and have meetings booked in makes it hard to take advantage of 😭 Will be plenty of birds on it tomorrow evening, it is surrounded by standing crop as field is just cut in a big patch but very deliberately (following flags set out in a bendy line) so hopefully this will be the start of the pigeons hitting the field properly. 

Also the silage I’ve seen for diary tends to be brought in loose in huge clamps near the cattle shed rather than wrapped in meal sized portions. North Wales. 

Edited by WalkedUp
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It's not uncommon to wrap green cereal crops for silage.  Makes for easy feeding of young beast either in separate lairage or out in the field, just poke a front tine through and take it where needed. Clamped silage is almost always carefully measured into feed mixers these days with all sorts of extra goodies and then fed to indoor dairy cows zero grazed.

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could also be a mistake..............the ole boy who has worked for the farmer since 1878.....needs to go to specsavers...

 

when you see the sugarbeet baled ....thats when you need to get suspisious.....

Edited by ditchman
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11 hours ago, WalkedUp said:

Why has my farmer done this???

47EEF181-C56B-4649-8EEE-9C32CC723AE4.jpeg

 

2 hours ago, mellors said:

Had the same here farmer said its due to black grass. 

IMG-20210624-WA0000.jpg

IMG-20210624-WA0001.jpg

Just looks like my perm at the moment. Farmer has planted right into the margins this year to make up for last year. 

I hope he puts off cutting untill after the 18th July as all that shoot the perm are away 😬

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Posted (edited)

Another question relating to barley that I have is what does it mean when the farmer is spraying it off? I know why this is done on a rape crop but why do they spray off a barley crop and does it mean it is soon to be cut after spraying? Ps sorry to hi jack the original thread but thought it relevant in the scheme of things.

Edited by BinaryB
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It kills the plants and brings the harvest forward that will be cut in a couple of  weeks . It's  not that uncommon especially if there is some green stuff in the crop.

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Doesn't so much bring harvest forward but ensures it is all ready all at one time.

Another 'bad' idea that has grown with glyphosate useage being used for more than weed control for which it was never designed to be put on food close to harvest as residuals are greater on food.

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15 minutes ago, Stonepark said:

Doesn't so much bring harvest forward but ensures it is all ready all at one time.

Another 'bad' idea that has grown with glyphosate useage being used for more than weed control for which it was never designed to be put on food close to harvest as residuals are greater on food.

Agreed.

The use of glyphosate in this way is lazy and dangerous farming.

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1 hour ago, JDog said:

Agreed.

The use of glyphosate in this way is lazy and dangerous farming.

seems very un-natural.............i know we spray OSR with "pod stick"....and spray off the halm with acid for potayoes.....but that does seem a bit unnatural

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Stonepark said:

Doesn't so much bring harvest forward but ensures it is all ready all at one time.

Another 'bad' idea that has grown with glyphosate useage being used for more than weed control for which it was never designed to be put on food close to harvest as residuals are greater on food.

Thank you for the explanation. Very interesting. I’m assuming after the application, the crop would be left for a couple of weeks in order for the glyphosate to work?

Edited by BinaryB
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19 hours ago, Stonepark said:

10 days normally, it just dries out any crop not quite ripe, so it is easier to handle without clogging machines.

Just what I was after. Thanks. 

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