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Police corruption


henry d
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59 minutes ago, 12gauge82 said:

Do you really believe that the met police force, or any other force for that matter, would be happy with, or tolerate one of their officers going around committing indecent exposure, much less rape or murder. Your post is utterly ridiculous. 

Henry didn't say or suggest that rape and murder would be tolerated. 

I for one wholeheartedly agree with Henry's comment. Ridiculous it is not.

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5 hours ago, bruno22rf said:

I wouldn't trust a Copper as far as I could throw one, too many of them have lost the plot and think they are better than the man in the street. Different 40 years ago when I had total respect for them, now I would not give them the time of day.

Sad to say I’m with you on this

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53 minutes ago, CharlieT said:

Henry didn't say or suggest that rape and murder would be tolerated. 

I for one wholeheartedly agree with Henry's comment. Ridiculous it is not.

Okay ill go with that, but indecent exposure? 

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As far as the accusation goes for indecent exposure, or if that wasn't the exact accusation it was pretty close. I do know there's no way in this world of "pigs puddin" would i have firearms in my cabinets if that had of been me. Yet he was still a server officer or whatever in the police force, so wrong in every account. 

Not interested in any excuse or reason why he was not sacked and carried on his service, it would be no surprise to me if he still received his full pension. 

 

It makes a mockery of the whole force and like many others i have no faith in the uniform. 

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2 hours ago, Dougy said:

As far as the accusation goes for indecent exposure, or if that wasn't the exact accusation it was pretty close. I do know there's no way in this world of "pigs puddin" would i have firearms in my cabinets if that had of been me. Yet he was still a server officer or whatever in the police force, so wrong in every account. 

Not interested in any excuse or reason why he was not sacked and carried on his service, it would be no surprise to me if he still received his full pension. 

 

It makes a mockery of the whole force and like many others i have no faith in the uniform. 

Absolutely agree with you there. 

It's obvious there's been a huge failure. The point I made above, is that to suggest the powers that be believed he was going around commiting indecent exposure and choosing to ignore it is ridiculous. 

That's tin foil hat stuff. 

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4 hours ago, CharlieT said:

Henry didn't say or suggest that rape and murder would be tolerated. 

I for one wholeheartedly agree with Henry's comment. Ridiculous it is not.

I don't believe that any police force would tolerate any wrong doing per se, but individuals in those forces for whatever reason have. I am not blind to the notion that police have to use certain tactics to get the right result when necessary but it has to be a level playing field, if the bad un is a copper then the same rules apply across the board.

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My observation of the police are ,whatever they say is perfectly legal and you must obey their commands/instructions ,they are so accustomed   to the public complying that they feel they can say any **** they want as many of them  dont know the law  and get away with it. Watch the TV progs on them ,made out to be the knights of the road who can spot bad uns at a mile away,more like a comedy of errors and bad ,really bad farcical commentary of men in so called rag tag  uniform ,some even wearing the defaced union flag,

God help us as that lot are there to serve and protect us

Edited by AULD YIN
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Are the police really any different from any other group of people. Are all Nurses Beverly Allett are all Doctors Harold Shipman. How many times have people stood up for a work colleague without really knowing them. How many times has someone come on this site and talked about accusations made against them and straight away members automatically take their side purely due to the fact they share similar interests. Why is it so strange to think this policeman's colleagues would initially support him. But no all coppers are scum because of one man.

Put it this way someone comes on here saying *I've lost my guns because my wife reported me to the police for a row" straight away she's an anti bitch and the police are overreacting. If it then turns out poster has kicked the **** out of his wife and kids does that then make those who offered him support scum. 

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11 hours ago, henry d said:

I don't believe that any police force would tolerate any wrong doing per se, but individuals in those forces for whatever reason have. I am not blind to the notion that police have to use certain tactics to get the right result when necessary but it has to be a level playing field, if the bad un is a copper then the same rules apply across the board.

What your stating above isn't beyond the realms of possibility. But that's not how you original post came across when you said this.... 

 

 

 

What is happening with those who are supposed to be upholding the law, is it a cultural thing or just a few bad apples. To me it would appear to be the former and if he had been suspended in February this young woman may not have been killed. Totally sad state of affairs.

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If your in a position to enforce the law then you should ensure you don't put yourself in the position to fall foul of it. 

Employers responsibility  

 

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All these armchair coppers and cop-haters on this thread have yet to acknowledge the flip side of the coin that goes with an honest, accountable and transparent police force. That is, ensuring their officers are protected from malicious allegations from bitter members of the public. How do you propose to tackle that?

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100% not police hater  but we pay for their  service so is it wrong for us to express our opinion ,,, my opinion is personable interaction with the police ,re your malicious allegations thats when your phone camera  and police camera should come in to action , we the public are accountable for our actions  AND so should the police contrary to what many of them think ,gone is the day when  ordered  to bend over we were expected to say how far SIR 

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On 11/07/2021 at 12:21, Gordon R said:

JohnfromUK

I agree with your view. Since Jim Anderton didn't get the Met job, we seem to have gone downhill, with Chief Constables more akin to Politicians than old fashioned coppers.

Nail firmly on the head.  I go back a long time in the force but toward the end of my time, end of the 80s it had started. Almost turn a blind eye. Two of us went and reported our feelings to our Inspector about a member of our team and his reply was, nothing I can do it would be political dynamite. That person was caught moving drug money a few years after I retired.  It rests with the senior branch of the force.  I saw some good coppers asked to leave for a lot less than what we see today. One found asleep on a bus shelter bench at 06.30 when he went missing on nights. He was out of the job the next day. 

Edited by Walker570
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Neville is right about the timing. A good (shooting) policeman friend of mine who retired as superintendent was sent on a weeks course around 1989 as an inspector. When he returned he always corrected anyone mentioning the ‘police force’ by saying, “we are no longer a force, we are the police service.” Certainly, for him, that is when the rot started. He was never the same man again.

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2 hours ago, udderlyoffroad said:

All these armchair coppers and cop-haters on this thread have yet to acknowledge the flip side of the coin that goes with an honest, accountable and transparent police force. That is, ensuring their officers are protected from malicious allegations from bitter members of the public. How do you propose to tackle that?

Hate is a strong word thats not used buy me very often, and not used in the thread. 

As far as i am concerned i have allot less faith now than i used to, my dealings with the police force in my life has been minimal. . I knew quite a few that joined the force from school, and drank with enough over the years and the opinion from them was the same, they all got out as soon as they could claim the pension. 

Im not an armchair copper and i dont hate coppers !, but i do not agree that someone placed in a position of trust stays in that position when they step out of line. 

Edited by Dougy
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One of the things I have said on here many times before, having lived and worked in America, is the massive discrepancy between police numbers in America compared to here. Even a small rural town police force in the middle of nowhere would have six or seven cruisers patrolling the town limits at night. Bored out of their mind with nothing to do.

There are the town police, then on top of that, the county police then on top again the State police and Highway Patrol. Plus of course overseeing it all the FBI.

All covering a sleepy rural small town where nothing ever happened 

The resources in terms of police manpower compared to here is just incredible. Also what we don't realise is that a lot of America is comparatively crime free. Sure they have really serious crime hot spots and terrible poverty. But bugulary for example is about a fifteenth of what it is here. Firstly because if the home owner catches a burglar in his house he is perfectly allowed to shoot him (in the front, not the back in my state) no questions asked. Which acts as a pretty  good deterrent

Plus a first offence burglar would get seven years, second offence would be fourteen years and a third offence would be life. Phone the police where I used to live to report a suspicious person and you would get six cars in a matter of minutes 

British police are not corrupt, they are just too stretched to be able to do their jobs and too wrapped up form filling  

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Your experience of small-town America must be different to mine.  Ok, small, relatively isolated community but on the tourist trail.  3 cops.  Sure, they can 'push the panic button' and get support from the State-ys, highway patrol, etc, but certainly not instantly.  Maybe 30mins fast blat down the Interstate.

But yes, the ever present threat of rapid-onset lead poisoning gives the average meth-addled toe-rag pause for thought before 'burglarising' a house.

And as stated on here before, I certainly feel fare safer in the US than I do in the UK. 

Anyway, we could instantly free up police resources if we stopped all this 'non crime hate incident' nonsense, and policing social media.

 

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I do wonder where they all are though Vince, what are they doing for heavens sake.  In September 1990 the night I retired our small Division put out three Mike cars(single manned), 2 Zulus(double manned) and two Traffic Patrol cars(double manned). We prided ourselves in appearing at the scene of any report within a few minutes, sometimes less.   One night that week I was working an extra 4 hrs to cover for the night shift being short handed due to holidays.  We caught two potential burglars and when having a cuppa in the canteen before going home one of the women officers on the other shift turned and said  " you serious about this job ain't yer".  I didn't look at her but just said Yes, that is what I'm paid for" as I walked out the door.  I do think the rot had set in by then.  The lads and lasses on my shift where brilliant and we all worked as a team watching each others backs and doing the job.  We were out there always looking watching checking and also caring for the unfortunate.  There was two sides to the job.

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2 hours ago, Walker570 said:

Nail firmly on the head.  I go back a long time in the force but toward the end of my time, end of the 80s it had started. Almost turn a blind eye. Two of us went and reported our feelings to our Inspector about a member of our team and his reply was, nothing I can do it would be political dynamite. That person was caught moving drug money a few years after I retired.  It rests with the senior branch of the force.  I saw some good coppers asked to leave for a lot less than what we see today. One found asleep on a bus shelter bench at 06.30 when he went missing on nights. He was out of the job the next day. 

Yes but on a different note, my lifelong friend who's father owned a small clothing manufacturing business in the East End of London in the 60s clearly and regularly remembers the Met Police coming round each month to collect "their money". Handed over in the proverbial brown envelopes. They would go from one door to the next, up one side of the road then down the other side every month. Across the whole of London it must have been a huge and well organised racket.

Edited by Vince Green
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7 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

In September 1990 the night I retired

 

7 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

One night that week I was working an extra 4 hrs

 

7 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

I do think the rot had set in by then. 

 

Ohhhh do come off it!  Everything was hunky dory till just before you left?  I bet there were coppers retiring when you started who thought you were some wet-behind-the-ears useless upstart, and that the rot had set in then, too.

There are good and bad coppers, lazy scrotes and corrupt scrotes.  Always have been.  I know a couple of currently in the job*, who were most annoyed at a couple of colleagues for not pulling their weight.  Much relief all round when one was finally kicked out of the job and faced a criminal charge of malfeasance.  

*but note never 'serving' - they are civilians, not military. 

 

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On 11/07/2021 at 15:11, McSpredder said:

Sir Robert Mark,  Commissioner of the Met in the 1970s, said:  "A good police force is one that catches more crooks than it employs"

Didnt he also say Dunlop Tyres were brilliant! A major contribution to road safety - I think. Obviously a man to depend on!

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