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First aid kit and wound care


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I managed by some pure miracle to stick my very sharp and incredibly dirty pen knife into my forearm on Friday. I felt like it went right to the bone. It was a deep but once I assessed it wasn't running like a tap I got Mrs BTJ to get me some medi wipes and wound dressing - if it had been pouring blood I'd have had to sort it myself because she's a massive panicker! It definitely needed flushing out and I thought it might need a stitch or 2. Managed to persuade the Dr's to get the practice nurse to have a look at it, as I'd be passing on my way to A&E, and she gave a really good clean and stuck some steri strips on it to hold it together.

I'm curious as to what everyone has got in their cupboard for gluing bits back on and looking after them once they're glued back on! I've got quite a good first aid kit that I keep in my shooting bag.

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9 minutes ago, London Best said:

Makes me laugh to think we are mostly creeping about in the woods with .30cal rifles and carrying a packet of plasters in case things go wrong!

😂 I've got plasters and alcohol wipes so I could slowly suck them and drink myself to unconciouness. 

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I swear by and will now always keep a medical sterilised stapler in my med kit. I've had to use it on the dog and myself in the past now! I wouldn't go anywhere without it, it'll hold as a temporary suture or in the dogs case when he has a minor skin tear from a barbed wire fence and we were able to clean him up and patch him whilst on holiday and in the middle of nowhere. 

Some good quality anti septic, some basic dressings and a medi stapler are the 3 must haves imo. Humans and K9's!! 

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4 minutes ago, CountryBoyTweed said:

I swear by and will now always keep a medical sterilised stapler in my med kit. I've had to use it on the dog and myself in the past now! I wouldn't go anywhere without it, it'll hold as a temporary suture or in the dogs case when he has a minor skin tear from a barbed wire fence and we were able to clean him up and patch him whilst on holiday and in the middle of nowhere. 

Some good quality anti septic, some basic dressings and a medi stapler are the 3 must haves imo. Humans and K9's!! 

Yeah I was ruing not having a medical stapler after my lurcher ran up a tree and ripped her leg last year, a good clean and a few staples would have saved me £300!

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I've got a first aid kit in my truck that covers from opps to OH ****K!  it has different section for different first aid problems, I had one much the same years ago that had room to add some bits and also had a couple of flares and a bright orange flag/space blanket, but one day after using it on a hill somewhere to help someone out someone else thought they would help by clearing it away.

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I always keep super glue handy for closing small wounds.

After nearly losing my ear to some scrotes boot on the rugby pitch that's exactly what the A+E staff used to put it back together.

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Lagavulin 16 year old and a stiff upper lip 😁 

Honestly though... usual selection of bandages and gauze. Mother-in-law recently gave us a bunch of iodine patches (for some reason?!) that actually do seem like a useful thing to have in stock... 

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I have full kits in my truck and on our boat. Including spray anisceptics and steri strips. Tubular guaze is a must for fingers and large field swab / dressings are great too in case of a large wound. Some pain killers held back from an elderly relative are also worth having to hand 🤫

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Here's the emergency kit I take in to the bush. I sometimes carry it big distances, so it's kept as light/small as possible and fits in a small pouch. If you're hunting out the back of a truck, it doesn't matter how much gear you take within reason. Couple of observations. Don't turn in to an amateur paramedic. There's no point carrying kit that you don't know how to use. Some of the guys here carry military-style tourniquets for control of serious haemorrhage from a limb. I'm undecided on that to be honest. As for a .30 cal bullet to the head, chest or the abdomen, I don't think anything you carry is going to make any difference apart from maybe a PLB/satellite phone if out of cellular reception. 

 image.png.c63bfd6fb4b57ef5c5081a1d20d01c96.png

 

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Hi , the latter thinking is to try and avoid celox granules and use the gauze as to the granules having to be cleaned out of a wound when reaching hospital which is both painful and can reopen the wound , but if it saves a life then it’s worth it ! 

The other items worth carrying in a shooting first aid kit is an Israeli bandage and a cat tourniquet but you need to know how to use them 

the other great thing to have is the “ what three words “ app , the emergency services use this and if you work in the countryside it’s great to get them to you much quicker than trying to give an address or directions , look it up if you don’t know it 

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On 23/08/2021 at 18:46, Rob85 said:

I always keep super glue handy for closing small wounds.

After nearly losing my ear to some scrotes boot on the rugby pitch that's exactly what the A+E staff used to put it back together.

Just make sure it’s medical grade , not the cheap stuff you can get in Poundland , think the ones hospitals use is called dermabond  

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  • 2 weeks later...

I’ve just made up a couple of first aid kits which are smaller than the ones I have in my hill walking rucksacks.  One of them will be going in my shooting bag.  For me personally, I don’t think I need to be able to cover every medical eventuality such as splinting a leg or having a bespoke sling.  My main focus is being able to deal with a big bleed and then having some gauze/plasters etc for patching up minor cuts until I can get somewhere to deal with/have them dealt with properly.

I also carry some simple analgesia, based on the knowledge that if you do turn or break an ankle out in the woods/moors,/hills with the best will in the world it’s going to be at least an hour until medical attention  gets to you.  In the interim, a combination of paracetamol and brufen will take the edge off.  Also, if you are remote and the ambulance service request assistance from the local mountain or fell rescue team, if the MR team get to you first, they can give stronger pain relief but they are limited to the doseage they can administer, however it works really well in conjunction with the paracetamol and brufen as a ‘holy trinity’.  On top of those two drugs, I also, and reccomend my friend to, have some aspirin.  I’m sure a lot of us are ‘of a certain age’ and being able to chew on aspirin at the onset of getting chest pains could literally be a life saver.  I think I paid about a quid for a pack of each of all three in Morrison’s last week - I reckon they are definitely worth the expense!

On the celox front, if you are considering buying some, take a look at the gauze strips over the granules, you have the ability to pack it exactly where you want, but also, in a strong wind of sideways rain, it’s much easier to administer/use than the granules.

Like a true sad sack, I vacuum packed my new kits to keep them waterproof and compact - I have to say, vacuum packing random stuff is really satisfying - I might have to make some more up 😀

4B815559-50FA-4E32-B328-A7A16BC78099.jpeg

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On 23/08/2021 at 23:24, Houseplant said:

Here's the emergency kit I take in to the bush. I sometimes carry it big distances, so it's kept as light/small as possible and fits in a small pouch. If you're hunting out the back of a truck, it doesn't matter how much gear you take within reason. Couple of observations. Don't turn in to an amateur paramedic. There's no point carrying kit that you don't know how to use. Some of the guys here carry military-style tourniquets for control of serious haemorrhage from a limb. I'm undecided on that to be honest. As for a .30 cal bullet to the head, chest or the abdomen, I don't think anything you carry is going to make any difference apart from maybe a PLB/satellite phone if out of cellular reception. 

 image.png.c63bfd6fb4b57ef5c5081a1d20d01c96.png

 

A good CAT tourniquet is a must also! a shot or tear to an arm or leg can be devastating. I have tore my leg badly on barbed wire and ran an axe in to my foot before, luckily didn't have the need for a tourniquet but easily could have. small and compact fits in a normal 1st aid kit.  

e.g.

Tourniquet Emergency Strap Outdoor First Aids Severe Life Saving Hemorrhage | eBay

 

simple to use, even one handed. I keep in the house, both cars and in the shooting bag. Even for the case of coming across and accident etc at least you can help.

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I work with chainsaws and power tools, mostly on my own, I shoot (often on my own). So I booked myself on a F.A.W.+F course, now I carry a trauma kit on my fuel can and whilst shooting, it's no good in the truck when you really need it.

Cat tourniquet, Israeli bandage x2, scissors, whistle + bits and bobs. Most minor stuff can be dealt with using electrical tape and toilet paper😁

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