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Gun Cleaning Routines


WessexTom
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A turks head is usually a heavy way of doing something quickly rather than soaking it out over a week or so.

It will cause very little harm to the bore just as long as it goes all the way through in one direction. Breech to muzzle.

 

 

Many years ago I made a barrel bath. When I was shooting several guns competitively, I could leave a set of barrels soaking horizontally fully submersed in either light oil or white spirits.

A week later, open the tap, drain off the dirty liquid through a funnel with a coffee filter paper in to a container.

The lumps left in the bottom of the bath were an eye opener.

Edited by TIGHTCHOKE
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12 hours ago, harrycatcat1 said:

Not wanting to be controversial but my 35 year old Baikal o/u with chrome lined barrels has always had a good clean every boxing day whether it needed it or not.

It's had thousands upon thousands of cartridges through it and it's never missed a beat. Between cleans it sometimes got a spray with wd 40.

 

On 29/09/2021 at 17:08, bluesj said:

Guns that I use for fun (for want of a better word) get cleaned after every time out, work guns not so much they get a clean every few weeks give or take a month.

We are clearly into the minority section , all my guns ( 5 ) are side by sides and the newest one would be around 50 / 60 years old or maybe older than that ( B S A ejector ) This old gun have been fed many 1000s of cartridges through it and have never failed to function and the only time it went to a gun shop was to have a new top lever fitted , alright , it is showing its age but it can still kill pigeons as good as any gun out of a show room , cleaning wise it get the full works every so often , which is no more than one or twice a year , a quick clean about monthly , and a wipe with a oily rag and a rod pushed through the barrels about once a week .

My other guns don't get used that often so only get the odd wipe over if and when I take them out of the gun cabinet , my pride and joy is a English side lock ejector in perfect condition , been to London to be reproofed and serviced by Richardson's of Halesworth and that only come out of the cabinet to be looked at , or used on the very odd occasion and that gun is now around 100 years old.

I am not saying lack of cleaning is the right thing to do , but is it really necessary to strip them down and give them a good clean after every time they come out of the cabinet ??

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1 minute ago, marsh man said:

 

We are clearly into the minority section , all my guns ( 5 ) are side by sides and the newest one would be around 50 / 60 years old or maybe older than that ( B S A ejector ) This old gun have been fed many 1000s of cartridges through it and have never failed to function and the only time it went to a gun shop was to have a new top lever fitted , alright , it is showing its age but it can still kill pigeons as good as any gun out of a show room , cleaning wise it get the full works every so often , which is no more than one or twice a year , a quick clean about monthly , and a wipe with a oily rag and a rod pushed through the barrels about once a week .

My other guns don't get used that often so only get the odd wipe over if and when I take them out of the gun cabinet , my pride and joy is a English side lock ejector in perfect condition , been to London to be reproofed and serviced by Richardson's of Halesworth and that only come out of the cabinet to be looked at , or used on the very odd occasion and that gun is now around 100 years old.

I am not saying lack of cleaning is the right thing to do , but is it really necessary to strip them down and give them a good clean after every time they come out of the cabinet ??

Should we not be getting pics of the pride and joy on the sxs forum?

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1 minute ago, button said:

Should we not be getting pics of the pride and joy on the sxs forum?

Believe it or not there are photos somewhere on the s x s forum and a kind member gave me a lot of information on that gun and one of my hammer guns that I didn't know about , when I get time I will see if I can find it and get back to you :good:

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On 28/09/2021 at 21:49, WessexTom said:

So being new to this forum, thought I’d ask about for a bit of advice on people’s cleaning routines for their shotguns? 
I’m definitely of the school that if the gun gets shot, it gets cleaned- mine never go away dirty. That said, my routine tends to just be run through the barrels with a bronze brush, then a paradox, then pull an oily rag through. Wipe off the metalwork with oil, clean the wood and put back together. 
I know this does the job as a basic clean, but what do you guys do for a more thorough 

On 28/09/2021 at 21:49, WessexTom said:

So being new to this forum, thought I’d ask about for a bit of advice on people’s cleaning routines for their shotguns? 
I’m definitely of the school that if the gun gets shot, it gets cleaned- mine never go away dirty. That said, my routine tends to just be run through the barrels with a bronze brush, then a paradox, then pull an oily rag through. Wipe off the metalwork with oil, clean the wood and put back together. 
I know this does the job as a basic clean, but what do you guys do for a more thorough clean? 

What about adjustable stocks

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12 hours ago, Taileron said:

I have tried multiple different ways and multiple types of cleaners to remove the lead fowling which seems to be a problem on my Miroku’s. Some were marginally better than others but it was still a problem. I stumbled upon a Hoppes Tornado Brush, revelation. It removes all fouling in literally under a minute with no need for spraying/soaking for 30 mins then scrubbing the bores. The thread is American and won’t fit English threads so I bought some cheapo American thread brushes and rods off flea bay. Best £7.99 I have spent in a while.

 

Many thanks Taileron. There's a tornado style brush included in the cleaning kit I bought with the gun.

Yes, I agree it's really effective on the lead fowling in the barrels but doesnt touch the lead fowling in the last 1/4 inch of the chamber. 

Still on the look for a solution.

On 30/09/2021 at 14:31, JohnfromUK said:

Although I always use fibre - I don't get much of this for some reason (except in my 0.410) - but a couple of ideas;

  1. Leave the cleaner for 20 mins/half an hour to 'work' before wiping out (I use tissue/loo paper)
  2. Get a 'Turks head" steel brush - very effective.  Not so easy to get these days.

What I never do is use wirewool - the little bits get everywhere, including under the extractors etc.

Edit: Available here apparently https://www.vikingshoot.com/products/cleaning/pro-shot-cleaning-products/pro-shot-shotgun-cleaning-products/

Thanks.

Is there a potential to damage the inside of the barrels with a steel cleaning implement?

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Lead fouling?? What cartridges are you guys using?  I get a bit of **** down the bores but not "fouling".  I shoot a min' of twice a week and a max' of four times, but the gun is only cleaned once a week, when it gets a quick pull through with the snake and they're clean and shiney. Chokes removed and thread re-greased every third clean.

As an aside, ever had the boresnake "string" break and leave the snake halfway down a barrel?  I have.......Oh what fun that was.

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9 hours ago, Poor Shot said:

Is there a potential to damage the inside of the barrels with a steel cleaning implement?

There have over the years been suggestions that any 'steel' is a damage risk on steel barrels (because they are equally hard materials).  There is some 'logic' in this, but in fact I have never heard any evidence that any damage occurs.  The fact is that taking two pieces of steel and rubbing one on the other hardly wears either away very fast - especially if running in oil!  So - I think the risk of damage is near zero in normal use.  Much more risk of damage from corrosion.

8 hours ago, London Best said:

A Turks head brush I only touches the bore with the radius of the wire so does not damage the bore.

This probably also plays a part.

Personally - I have a Turks head - and use it when needed (very rarely for me) if my normal brass type Payne Gallwey and 15 mins or so soak with Young's 303 has failed to give a clean result.

9 hours ago, Poor Shot said:

in the last 1/4 inch of the chamber

You mention chambers - and the fouling being on the chamber side of the forcing cones.  Just a thought.  In my 12 bores I use 2 1/2" cartridges mainly in 2 1/2" chambers but occasionally 2 3/4" chambers (such as AyA, or an o/u).   I get at worst very minimal fouling in the chamber, but generally virtually none.  I wonder if the larger gap - larger still for 3" chambers, (an example of which I don't have) may make this fouling more likely?  If so, is a chamber brush needed?

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5 hours ago, JohnfromUK said:

There have over the years been suggestions that any 'steel' is a damage risk on steel barrels (because they are equally hard materials).  There is some 'logic' in this, but in fact I have never heard any evidence that any damage occurs.  The fact is that taking two pieces of steel and rubbing one on the other hardly wears either away very fast - especially if running in oil!  So - I think the risk of damage is near zero in normal use.  Much more risk of damage from corrosion.

This probably also plays a part.

Personally - I have a Turks head - and use it when needed (very rarely for me) if my normal brass type Payne Gallwey and 15 mins or so soak with Young's 303 has failed to give a clean result.

You mention chambers - and the fouling being on the chamber side of the forcing cones.  Just a thought.  In my 12 bores I use 2 1/2" cartridges mainly in 2 1/2" chambers but occasionally 2 3/4" chambers (such as AyA, or an o/u).   I get at worst very minimal fouling in the chamber, but generally virtually none.  I wonder if the larger gap - larger still for 3" chambers, (an example of which I don't have) may make this fouling more likely?  If so, is a chamber brush needed?

I have a  browning with overbored barrels and three inch chambers with long forcing cones and I only ever shoot fibre wads and 65 or 70mm cartridges . I never get any serious fouling. certainly not lead. My barrels are of course chrome lined. Perhaps the lead fouling problem is on older or cheaper barrels which are just polished. The degree of finish being dependant on the quality of the gun!

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1 minute ago, DUNKS said:

I have a  browning with overbored barrels and three inch chambers with long forcing cones and I only ever shoot fibre wads and 65 or 70mm cartridges . I never get any serious fouling. certainly not lead. My barrels are of course chrome lined. Perhaps the lead fouling problem is on older or cheaper barrels which are just polished. The degree of finish being dependant on the quality of the gun!

It was just a thought.  I don't get lead fouling - except in my 0.410 - which has 3" chambers (and I shoot 2" or 2 1/2" cartridges in it).  I am also aware that 0.410 runs a high pressure - which is the most likely cause in my mind.

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On 02/10/2021 at 19:59, harrycatcat1 said:

Not wanting to be controversial but my 35 year old Baikal o/u with chrome lined barrels has always had a good clean every boxing day whether it needed it or not.

It's had thousands upon thousands of cartridges through it and it's never missed a beat. Between cleans it sometimes got a spray with wd 40.

Harry a bit effort needed ! I shove the turks head through at the end of February and a squirt of wd40 at the start of September .

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13 minutes ago, derbyduck said:

Harry a bit effort needed ! I shove the turks head through at the end of February and a squirt of wd40 at the start of September .

Then wonder why your ejector/extractors are sticking next season in the waxy gunge left by the WD40.

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Good squirt of lagera spray down both barrels and work through with bronze brush leave while make and drink a cuppa and put all other gun stuff away ( 10 /15 mins)

pull 3 bore snakes through from dirty to clean. 

wipe action down and woodwork down.

chokes removed cleaned ever 3/4 shoots.

goose feather through barrel vents when the get grubby

Every 250 oil ejectors ( graphite oil) Work through wipe away excess.

Gun sometimes goes away dirty if I have shot like a t1t ! Cleaned well if I have had a good outing.

image.jpg

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Sorry to resurrect this topic, but I saw a short film a couple of days ago by the Oxford Gun Company about gun cleaning.

1. Spray solvent onto a patch and push it through. Fair enough.

2. Spray a bit more onto a brush and scrub. OK.

3. Remove resulting black muck with the wool mop. REALLY??
 

Sounds like a good way to get through a lot of mops.

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2 hours ago, Townie said:

Sounds like a good way to get through a lot of mops.

It does indeed.

Personally, I use loo paper or kitchen paper to clear out both loose fouling pre cleaning, and used solvent/cleaner after it has had a chance to do it's stuff.  I have also heard of using newspaper, cut up old rag, 4 x 2 cloth.  Anything will do, but you chuck it away when dirty - which is every use!

I prefer a hair (i.e. not metal) bristle brush to lightly oil the barrels to a wool mop, but that's just my preference.

Edited by JohnfromUK
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1 hour ago, JohnfromUK said:

It does indeed.

Personally, I use loo paper or kitchen paper to clear out both loose fouling pre cleaning, and used solvent/cleaner after it has had a chance to do it's stuff.  I have also hear of using newspaper, cut up old rag, 4 x 2 cloth.  Anytrhing will do, but you check it away when dirty - which is every use!

I prefer a hair (i.e. not metal) bristle brush to lightly oil the barrels to a wool mop, but that's just my preference.

Yes, the old advice was to use a wool mop or hair/nylon bristle brush for oiling the bores, certainly never to clean muck out of the bores with a mop. Really bad advice from the Oxford Gun Co.

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1 minute ago, London Best said:

Yes, the old advice was to use a wool mop or hair/nylon bristle brush for oiling the bores, certainly never to clean muck out of the bores with a mop. Really bad advice from the Oxford Gun Co.

Perhaps it was done to sell more wool mops!  :w00t:

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