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Vibration test for steel shot proofing


grahamch
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Has anyone come across a vibration test that is used on non steel proofed guns to help determine if they are suitable for submitting for superior steel proofing?

A member of my syndicate has given his expensive game gun to a local gun shop of dubious reputation who said it need to have this test. 

Sounds like a load of twaddle to me!

 

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Never heard that one ,sent to the proof house it will pass or fail simple as that ,no way of pre testing for suitability as far as I know ,but happy to be enlightened,

sounds like another of these gun shops that know nothing about guns.

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1 hour ago, grahamch said:

Has anyone come across a vibration test that is used on non steel proofed guns to help determine if they are suitable for submitting for superior steel proofing?

A member of my syndicate has given his expensive game gun to a local gun shop of dubious reputation who said it need to have this test. 

Sounds like a load of twaddle to me!

 

maybe they are doing an ultra sound of the setting of the rib/ribs............

sounds like a snake oil salesman to me tho, 

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2 hours ago, grahamch said:

Has anyone come across a vibration test that is used on non steel proofed guns to help determine if they are suitable for submitting for superior steel proofing?

A member of my syndicate has given his expensive game gun to a local gun shop of dubious reputation who said it need to have this test. 

Sounds like a load of twaddle to me!

 

I have never heard of this either.  I may be wrong, but I think your "twaddle" may be the correct explanation.

My understanding is that Steel Proof is a 'usual' type of proof (by which I mean inspect, fire proof charges, and reinspect for changes, damage etc.) - but with a proof load that covers the pressures needed to prove for the much higher working level (HP steel) pressures.  There is only one proof level specifically for for steel (shown by the fleur de lis proof mark) which covers HP steel. 

In order to be accepted for proof the gun must be in general 'good order' (i.e. tight, free from pitting, all 'sound') - I wonder if the 'vibration test' is for a loose joint?  That is normally done by checking for vibration/rattle and gunmakers would do all this before submitting for proof.  With some self opening guns (e.g Beesley/Purdey), some strip down work is needed to do this because the self opening tension tends to mask looseness.  Other self openers (e.g. Holland type) only I think need the forend removed?

My understanding (and I have not specifically asked) from my gunmaker would be that to seek to get HP steel (fleur de lis) proof status on an older English gun not intended for that is very "high risk" because pressures well above the design intention would be involved - and chambers of a minimum of 2 3/4" would be needed - relatively few English Game guns have this - though live pigeon guns often do.  Could it be that your syndicate member is planning to have the chambers lengthened?  That could be quite risky, but is done sometimes.

As others have said 'standard' steel does not require separate proof ......... but the frequent issue is that many traditional game guns have 2 1/2" chambers (max 67mm) and even standard steel cartridge availability for that chamber length is very limited.

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Just now, London Best said:

The OP did not say his syndicate member had an English gun, merely that he had sent his “expensive game gun” to a shop. 
Many people would apply that description to an entry level Beretta. Perhaps you are assuming too much.

That is true.  the 2 1/2" part applies almost exclusively to English, but the other comments about steel proof only having the HP (fleur de lis) level needing a very much higher proof pressure than original still apply I think.  I must admit, an entry level Beretta doesn't fit my interpretation of "expensive game gun", but that's me I suppose.

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1 minute ago, JohnfromUK said:

That is true.  the 2 1/2" part applies almost exclusively to English, but the other comments about steel proof only having the HP (fleur de lis) level needing a very much higher proof pressure than original still apply I think.  I must admit, an entry level Beretta doesn't fit my interpretation of "expensive game gun", but that's me I suppose.

Not my idea either, (and I have nothing against them.) But lots of people aspire to such a thing and I have seen them described as a ‘high end gun’. Plenty of shooters simply can not afford a £1800 gun.

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10 hours ago, London Best said:

Not my idea either, (and I have nothing against them.) But lots of people aspire to such a thing and I have seen them described as a ‘high end gun’. Plenty of shooters simply can not afford a £1800 gun.

Let alone the cost of good cartridges!  :cool1:

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13 hours ago, grahamch said:

Has anyone come across a vibration test that is used on non steel proofed guns to help determine if they are suitable for submitting for superior steel proofing?

A member of my syndicate has given his expensive game gun to a local gun shop of dubious reputation who said it need to have this test. 

Sounds like a load of twaddle to me!

 

🤔 Perhaps they need to keep it over night to get the barrel at the right temperature. Then in the morning give them a flick to see if they ring. Then ask for the test fee. 

I will be interested in the results on there test certificate 😂

 

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23 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Two questions;

1.  Why would you take your gun to a Gun Shop of dubious reputation?

2.  Surely the Proof House and its Proof Test is the only way to go?

1. He was unaware when he took gun in;

2. Quite agree.

20 hours ago, London Best said:

The OP did not say his syndicate member had an English gun, merely that he had sent his “expensive game gun” to a shop. 
Many people would apply that description to an entry level Beretta. Perhaps you are assuming too much.

Browning Crown ckoked 1/2 and 1/2

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17 minutes ago, grahamch said:

 

Browning Crown ckoked 1/2 and 1/2

That IS a fairly expensive game gun, nephew has one. As a thoroughly modern shotgun I can’t believe Browning haven’t proofed them for steel, but there again I’d put steel through one without giving it a second thought. 

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