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EV's catching fire, seems to be common than is reported


Weihrauch17
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2 hours ago, Weihrauch17 said:

A friend of mine who makes fire retardent material has been tasked with making material to contain EV fires, the fires are ferocious and take hours to put out. 

Shipping container (20ft) that can pull a burning ev car inside, and allows you to drop up to 20m3 of cement in through roof to encase it, a la Chernobyl.

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1 hour ago, Weihrauch17 said:

They are totally unfeasable for 90% of the population on both cost or charging and if they can't be exported or travel on trains of Ferries what is the point.  Plus new battery at 8 years means they will be worthless near that age when the cost of a new battery is 10 > 15k.  Is the mining of all the precious metals green no and on top of that there will be nowhere near enough, the whole idea is a woke none starter. 

But it keeps the likes of Greta Thunderberg happy - and students are future voters. 

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I didn’t buy my EV, I business leased it on a cracking deal at the height of covid because (1) it’s 100% tax deductible (2) no ULEZ and no congestion charge (3) cheap as chips to run in terms of electricity bills (4) performance that makes you scream (0-60 in 4 seconds and immediate torque and power at any speed).

It was a purely economic decision and after 3 years I throw the keys back and I’ll get another albeit I expect the government to start rowing back on the financial incentives to get one.

I couldn’t give a monkeys if it catches fire (that’s what insurance is for) nor do I care about the environmental impact - it could run on Panda tears for all I care.

The bonus out of all of this is the breathtaking performance and ease by which I charge it up - I plug it in at home once or twice a week.

We did look at getting EV chargers at work for that added tax break (using work leccy to charge up) but the thieves at UK Power Networks wanted £15k to run fresh power from the road to the office (a 15’ run) to give us 3 phase, and when the electricity running cost each month is about £60, even with that doubling to say £120 with crazy energy prices coming, that’s 10 years of charging right there in the cost of running a 15’ new supply. So we didn’t bother.

I can only speak from personal experience and that is I don’t see myself going back to petrol / diesel. That’s me, everyone else can buy and drive what they like.

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23 hours ago, Weihrauch17 said:

Well one caught fire and sunk a ship full of luxury EV's because they couldn't put it out and it spread, wait until insurers refuse to insure any ships including ferries carrying EV's.  It absolutely is a very real problem.  A friend of mine who makes fire retardent material has been tasked with making material to contain EV fires, the fires are ferocious and take hours to put out.  EV's are not the future and they are not green in any shape of form.

like i said extremes and hypotheticals. insurers havent refused to insure ships carying them  and i cant see why they would. was a maritime accident. cargo ships cart all manner of dangerous goods all over the world i cant imagine carrying a nissan leaf is the one that they decide is too much.

im sure the fires are difficult to contain but theirs like 400'000  ev and 750'000 hybrids in the uk  statisitcally they will be in accidents and faults will occure. its not like theyre popping off like its bonfire night. and the response and the means on how to deal with them will be developed and tackled case in point if thats what youre mate is doing right now.

EVs atm arnt the final end product. infact this is like the dawn of them. look at how quick  mobile phones advances when they started to catch on.  look at flight.... went from off the ground to across the atlantic in like 20 years.  theve come a long way and they will no doubt go a hell of alot further.

ive not got one im still on diesel they havent quite reached a state that theyre practical for me but to think theyre a none starter is a bold statment.  and to give people who have them  a hard time is a bit rought. theyre the folks that are funding the break throughs that will get them to the point that fossil fuel will seem so mental to the next generations

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Posted (edited)

Haven't stopped insuring them yet.  Who is giving anyone who has one a hard time, if you can afford one and they suit your needs then crack on no problem at all with that?  My problem is with this rancid Govt enforcing them on the population much like Heat Pumps which are also not wanted and are unaffordable and impractical to 95% of the population. My point is the vast majority don't have the ability to install a home charger.  They are way too expensive for most and will be worthless SH when their battery needs replacing, an awful investment depreciation wise unless you lease and swap every three years.  Petrol and Diesels can run for decades if looked after and are way greener than an EV when you look at their total Carbon foot prints.  There are not enough rare metals to go round for them to be the norm by a country mile and their extraction is very destructive.  EV's are simply not green, it is all one huge Government con to price the plebs off the road. 

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On 24/05/2022 at 22:20, Mungler said:

We did look at getting EV chargers at work for that added tax break (using work leccy to charge up) but the thieves at UK Power Networks wanted £15k to run fresh power from the road to the office (a 15’ run) to give us 3 phase, and when the electricity running cost each month is about £60, even with that doubling to say £120 with crazy energy prices coming, that’s 10 years of charging right there in the cost of running a 15’ new supply.

 

Sounds like they needed to add in an extra transformer to handle the load, a 100kva 3 phase transformer would set you back £6,000 to £8,000 on its own, never mind installation, 3 new meters, cabling, hotworking on joints etc, etc.

 

One of the problems of mass roll out of EV's and electrical heating is that every transformer will have to be replaced as the current ones are not designed to handle the electrical load that will be caused by charging, heating and showers all at once in the morning.

 

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8 hours ago, Stonepark said:

 

Sounds like they needed to add in an extra transformer to handle the load, a 100kva 3 phase transformer would set you back £6,000 to £8,000 on its own, never mind installation, 3 new meters, cabling, hotworking on joints etc, etc.

 

One of the problems of mass roll out of EV's and electrical heating is that every transformer will have to be replaced as the current ones are not designed to handle the electrical load that will be caused by charging, heating and showers all at once in the morning.

 


They have 3Phase in the garage next door and up and down the road.

The cost was because they said they needed to traffic light / close the road and pavement because that’s what procedure required. 

I’ve seen the network map as part of the quote and it’s picking up off the pavement, a straight line and it’s 15’.

I get it, they have a procedure which is designed for a uniform approach but I can’t help think we really are in a world where it is about whether the  ‘computer says no’.

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1 hour ago, Mungler said:


They have 3Phase in the garage next door and up and down the road.

The cost was because they said they needed to traffic light / close the road and pavement because that’s what procedure required. 

I’ve seen the network map as part of the quote and it’s picking up off the pavement, a straight line and it’s 15’.

I get it, they have a procedure which is designed for a uniform approach but I can’t help think we really are in a world where it is about whether the  ‘computer says no’.

If part of the works are contestable (normally most things except the jointing), you can appoint your own ICP (Independent Connections Provider), which is usually less expensive and is how house builders etc keep the costs down, in that the ICP does all the arrangment, digging and cable laying etc and the DNO (Distribution Network Operator) only does what is essential (hot connection and supply of meters).

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