Jump to content

Snake bite.


Recommended Posts

Hi gang.

              A friend of mine has had her dog bitten by a snake. The dog was in agony and rushed to the vets who treated it

              The dog is on the mend but my friends purse is £800 lighter. They sure know how to charge.

               But at least she still has her pet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Up working the dogs on grouse, forest of bowland, dog came onto an angry adder. Held point I went over and had a look (almost screamed when it went for me 🤣) I have a video somewhere. A few weeks later I missed the shoot. A dog was bitten, poison was so bad it would lose it’s leg so was put down. It was a picker upper’s dog (one of 6) but not very old. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I carry the veterinary drug DEXADRESON in my car, which is to be administered by me via syringe should one of our dogs get bitten by an adder.

 

This is not an anti venom by the vet says it will stabilise the dog until we get it into surgery.

 

Our vet did his thesis on snake bites, and apparently 3 % of dogs that are bitten by adders die, and 2.8 % of dogs that are bitten by adders are actually die as a result of the anti venom, hence, should he decide to administer anti venom, ( he holds some for me at my cost ) he will only do this at his practice.

Edited by tonyshooter
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, williamwansbeck said:

A&E Doctor told me a good few years back the antihistamine drug Piriton helps greatly to diminish symptoms in humans if given quickly.? and also would aid in dogs but (dont quote me was his get out)

I have heard piriton helps too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't have any wigg;ly sticks out there do you?  Strange when you think Australia has some of the most venomous in the world.

I was at a Texas Parks and Wildlife show once and a guy there had a very large rattle snake just curled up in the low grass. He was charging $25 a time to instantly train young dogs not to go near one . The snake had been neutralised but still struck if annoyed. Dogs where introduced on a longish lead and as the snake struck the electric collar button was pressed.  I only saw one pup, a wire hair pointer go and have a second look but most could not be dragged near that snake. Folks are against electric collars but that is one instance where it will probably save a dogs life.

Edited by Walker570
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My brothers Golden Retriever got bitten about 2 weeks ago on her front foot. Swelled up massive she was put on a drip and kept in the vets overnight but did not require the anti-venom. Was quoted £700 if she needed it. 

19 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

You don't have any wigg;ly sticks out there do you?  Strange when you think Australia has some of the most venomous in the world.

I was at a Texas Parks and Wildlife show once and a guy there had a very large rattle snake just curled up in the low grass. He was charging $25 a time to instantly train young dogs not to go near one . The snake had been neutralised but still struck if annoyed. Dogs where introduced on a longish lead and as the snake struck the electric collar button was pressed.  I only saw one pup, a wire hair pointer go and have a second look but most could not be dragged near that snake. Folks are against electric collars but that is one instance where it will probably save a dogs life.

I have seen something similar on tv. Very good use of an electric collar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have Rattlesnakes here that are similar to your Adders. Having worked in Vets offices and seen dogs come in with snake bites I "snake brake" my dogs to sight, sound and scent. When watching them you can tell when they have scented one as they make an arc out and around it.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, simcgunner said:

all my dogs got snake avoidance training. large rattle snakes used a small clear vented bottle over snakes head . e coller on pup. very effective training. dogs and snakes unharmed.

Thats abuse, not training in my book.

/M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Certainly the two dogs I saw 'trained' in Texas where none the worse for wear after a dab from the collar and enjoyed my ear scartching and patting afterwards but the owners could not drag their dogs towards that rattler, job done and more dogs safe from being bit. Adders are bad enough but if you saw a dog bitten by a rattler then you would not be iffy about this training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't see this training as abuse. The collers I use combine tone shock and location by Gps.  after training the dogs still get excited when the collers come out because they associate them with joy not punishment . This training  can be a life saving event. I also have my dogs tails docked to prevent breaking them in th field. and removing dewclaws to prevent them from tearing while a hard charging dog works in the field. again not abuse.36115582_olddogandpup1.jpg.3869950586c3f4e5a7600d630ffe1166.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 20/07/2022 at 13:44, wj939 said:

How would you train this yourself?

The same way, aversion therapy, but with other other tools that don't abuse the dog (e collars are banned around here anyway) or the target.

Long lead to control the pup and repeatedly show them that the item (shoes/other household items, raindeer, roe (for certain types of dogs), snake) is not something to investigate further. Requires more work but done proparly will give you the same results.

There is a whole industry here in Sweden regarding the testing of dogs on boar/bear in enclosures, both for training the dogs but also used for aversion.

/Markus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Part of the problem in dog training is the well intentioned but incorrect placing of human emotions upon dogs. when pups are taught by their seniors a nip or warning growl makes an impression. a momentary shock is harmless and reinforces a correct and likely lifesaving behavior. repeated aversion training (not therapy)is time consuming stressful (can be cruel) and can eventually work if repeated often and consistently enough. I would not have put one of my dogs down after being bit and have to loose a leg. we have had several tricycle dogs in our training club that do well after loosing a leg to cancer or other reason. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my Springer bitch got a bite on the cheek 5 years ago and was very ill, stayed in on drip ,vets worried airway would close up with swelling.  was told the antivenom was £400 should she need it .remember her face was a mess all swollen and sagged .she go

t over it but the small area of the bite is still bald today.

Seen the adder after think it was protecting a nest.

springers eh what to stick there heads in everything. only do early mornings and late evenings out now in summer to risky were we live for another encounter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...