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But what has it to do with your employer if you are subject to a private prosecution? What right do they have to dock your wages, seems a bit odd.

 

I think its because the Police are supposed to lead by example and their superiors wanted that message to get across.

 

As for the neighbour filming.There was a crime being committed and this was the perfect way of getting evidence.

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/wales/7869309.stm

 

was the neighbor allowed to film somebody elses property unless there is a sign?

 

df

 

 

Yes , if the neighbour was on his own land or indeed public property, anyone can be filmed/photograhed, how do you think the paparrazzi go on with royalty and stars? The only signs needed are for commercially operated cctv systems and that is just for data protection

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now not wanting to be contentious but I have seen far far worse than that on each and every driven day of the season?

strange country this seems the do gooders would rather a kid got kicked to death than a couple of dogs (rightly or wrongly) given a bit of a hard time

 

cheers KW

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thats awful, must have been going on for ages if the neighbours kept calling the rspca. my dogs got regular clips on the back side when they were pups, i didnt want to run the risk of a rottie growing up and deciding it wanted to be boss instead of me.

 

ive only ever kicked a dog once, and that was the day arnie killed a lamb, long story but he was lucky that was the worse that happened to him that day B)

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Police Officers are not technically employees with regard to employment law.They hold a badge of office which put restictions on their private lives and is governed by Police Misconduct regulations. They cant just be sacked but have to appear before a misconduct hearing. Off duty behaviour is dealt with under discreditable conduct in that it is a breach of the regs to bring discredit on the Police service.

 

Both were found guilty at court so the Police Force would not of retried the evidence but dealt with them for being convicted of an offence at a hearing involving senior Police Officers. Unless at the hearing we will never know the full story, although the video seems to speak for itself.

 

The force have obviously decided that the offence does not impinge on their duties and fined them instead but isnt good behaviour. What a couple of idiots if they think they will achieve anything by way of training by hitting dogs like that.

 

Pity that big Rotti didnt decide to defend itself, they would probably of been kicking him out the job on ill health for walking with a limp!.

Edited by Dibs
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A police spokesman said she would deffintly have been dimissed, But she was the only human roadblock at that station, Scum of the earth, They ought to jail them both and spread it about what they were doing, How can they EVER lecture / arrest anybody for right or wrong, They obviously dont know!

Edited by fishman307
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you should all understand that the police are the worst law offenders out of all of us.

 

Details released by 13 forces under the Freedom of Information Act show that 164 officers have been convicted of offences, some since they joined the police.

 

Of those forces that have so far disclosed their figures, Kent has the highest percentage of officers with a record. It employs 52 officers with convictions, almost 1.5% of its strength. Most are for traffic offences but the list includes criminal damage and public order offences.

 

In West Yorkshire, 10 of the 12 officers with records have been convicted of assault, all while in the force.

 

Earlier this year it emerged that 74 officers in the Metropolitan police had received either a conviction or a caution but were kept on, while in Hampshire 30 serving officers have convictions.

 

The figures suggest that among all 51 police forces in England, Scotland and Wales the number of officers with convictions could be as high as 500.

 

A criminal conviction does not automatically bar a person from becoming a police officer or lead to an officer being forced to leave the service, but evidence of dishonesty can be highly damaging to their own and their forces’ integrity.

 

Applicants with convictions are questioned at interview stage before a decision is made on whether they will be accepted. Forces use tribunals to “judge†the future of serving officers convicted of offences. The most commonly forgiven offence is drink driving.

 

Jan Berry, chairman of the Police Federation, said that each case should be looked at individually and, in more serious cases, officers should be sacked.

 

She said: “Clearly there are some offences where it would be totally unsuitable for an officer to either continue or be recruited in the first place.†She added: “There are some minor offences that you might be involved in when you are young and that does not mean you could not be a good police officer.â€

 

A spokeswoman for Kent police said of officers who are convicted: “If it is their honesty and integrity at question they will not remain.â€

 

Other forces that released information included South Yorkshire, where 20 officers have convictions, and Sussex, where there were 14 convictions among officers and one inspector was cautioned for being drunk and incapable.

 

Additional reporting: Tom Baird.

 

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&r...earch&meta=

 

:good::good:

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No wonder the UK is so ****** up.

 

Police beating their dogs is bad enough, just have the RSPCA take the dogs off them. But then it appears on national television, who gives a ****!.

 

The whole world is gone to pot at the moment and the BBC put up this kind of tripe as news, is it a ploy to get our minds off the recession?

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you should all understand that the police are the worst law offenders out of all of us.

 

Details released by 13 forces under the Freedom of Information Act show that 164 officers have been convicted of offences, some since they joined the police.

 

Of those forces that have so far disclosed their figures, Kent has the highest percentage of officers with a record. It employs 52 officers with convictions, almost 1.5% of its strength. Most are for traffic offences but the list includes criminal damage and public order offences.

 

In West Yorkshire, 10 of the 12 officers with records have been convicted of assault, all while in the force.

 

Earlier this year it emerged that 74 officers in the Metropolitan police had received either a conviction or a caution but were kept on, while in Hampshire 30 serving officers have convictions.

 

The figures suggest that among all 51 police forces in England, Scotland and Wales the number of officers with convictions could be as high as 500.

 

A criminal conviction does not automatically bar a person from becoming a police officer or lead to an officer being forced to leave the service, but evidence of dishonesty can be highly damaging to their own and their forces’ integrity.

 

Applicants with convictions are questioned at interview stage before a decision is made on whether they will be accepted. Forces use tribunals to “judge†the future of serving officers convicted of offences. The most commonly forgiven offence is drink driving.

 

Jan Berry, chairman of the Police Federation, said that each case should be looked at individually and, in more serious cases, officers should be sacked.

 

She said: “Clearly there are some offences where it would be totally unsuitable for an officer to either continue or be recruited in the first place.†She added: “There are some minor offences that you might be involved in when you are young and that does not mean you could not be a good police officer.â€

 

A spokeswoman for Kent police said of officers who are convicted: “If it is their honesty and integrity at question they will not remain.â€

 

Other forces that released information included South Yorkshire, where 20 officers have convictions, and Sussex, where there were 14 convictions among officers and one inspector was cautioned for being drunk and incapable.

 

Additional reporting: Tom Baird.

 

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&r...earch&meta=

 

:good::no:

 

 

The met is the worse!

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:look: :D Soap box time! :( :lol:

you should all understand that the police are the worst law offenders out of all of us.

 

I am not about to defend these two for what they have done but i do agree with having seen similar diciplining on shoot days.

 

With respect to the above quick to judge quote:

 

Even as a former PC this type of mentality annoys the hell out of me. The PUBLIC are on the whole very good with the odd minor cell of people whom love to tar Police officers with the same old brush.

 

The fact is that unlike most other employers a declaration has to be made on application to join whether the conviction is spent or not. Most other jobs couldnt care less. The speculation and demands by this small cell of the public expect the forces to be fully accountable. Now i agree with accountability BUT not when it comes to the point that it gets completely in the way of being able to do a proper days policing, without fear of loosing your job for doing the current perceved wrong thing of the week!

 

The requirement for knowledge of what your local force is doing is such a hinderance that in my old consabulary, once a year we had to fill in a survey of what we did with our working time on a daily basis in 15 minute blocks! Needless to say paperwork was the main answer!

 

If you want to see more officers on the streets doing the job they were employed to do and not the job that C3PO's (Police Community Suport Officers) then we need to stop this thirst for knowledge to the degree it is at currently.

 

The majority of officers out there are really decent and extremely hard working officers, tarnished by the few bad experiences you may have had.

 

Treat people the way you would expect to be treated yourself!

 

Rant over...for now!

Edited by Skippy
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Personally I'm not too sure what the video shows that most dog owners shouldn't be scared of. The rotweiller gets scruffed for jumping up at the back door and a tap on the nose, I can understand that and the other dog gets chased outside and told off for doing something inside. Yes they cower but you can make any dog do that with the right tone in your voice and especially if they know they've been naughty.

If my pointer chews something she knows she shouldn't she will hide even though we've never had serious words. Obviously there could be far more to it but that video as mentioned shows nothing I've not seen on a shooting field pretty much every week.

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