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On one of the farms i have been recently given permission to shoot on there are hundreds of corvids flying around all over the place i think this may have some thing to do with the large amount of sheep the land owner keeps. i went for a walk around yesturday and i found a spinney full of crow nests and when i say full i mean i counted 57 nests in one area, so i went in and hid the crows went nuts and flew all over the place but they kept coming in to check on there young, i managed to pick up 16 crows and 9 pigeons i had to leave because i only brought about 30 cratriges with me. i was wondering there is a weat field next to it so do you think they would come down on to that with the help of a spinner and some decoys thanks

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I personally dont like the idea of shooting Rooks at the Rookery until the Flappers or Branchers are out and then they are fair game and very tasty.

 

You could pop a few off early season with an air rifle but at the moment the eggs are hatched and I like to leave them to it.

 

You may not agree with me but if we are shooting in the name of Pest Control why dont we just put 2 12G shells through each nest and be done with it :lol:??

 

IMO the rook is not such and agricultural pest as many people believe and although omnivorous, grain and seed make up a small part of its diet during the breeding cycle. The pasture land favoured by sheep is also favoured by Crane fly lavae or leatherjackets which is staple for Rooks and Jackdaws.

 

FM.

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I must admitt that shooting the fledglings/branchers as they prepare to leave the safety of the nest is probably the most productive ways of controlling no-s.

 

I've been asked to shift them from a residential nursing home set in a rural estate. Got to wait a few more weeks before I can take the TX to work.

 

Aparently all the racket thy rooks are making are driving the little old dears barmey!. :lol:

 

Paul in North Lincs

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I must admitt that shooting the fledglings/branchers as they prepare to leave the safety of the nest is probably the most productive ways of controlling no-s.

 

I've been asked to shift them from a residential nursing home set in a rural estate. Got to wait a few more weeks before I can take the TX to work.

 

Aparently all the racket thy rooks are making are driving the little old dears barmey!. :lol:

 

Paul in North Lincs

You wont get rid of them unless you operate a complete cull year after year or excercise whole scale tree surgery. Rookeries are used year in year out by the same family colonies.

 

I have a photograph of my child hood village showing in the back ground a 100 nest colony dating from 1860 and there are still 100 plus nests in the same beech trees today.

 

Good luck.

 

FM.

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Quite right FM but it'll give me some continous shooting for years to come. Population control is the name of the this task, not total erradication. Aparently the trees cannot be touched as they are listed. (:shoot:??)

 

The grounds are mown and beatifully landscaped, it will make a cracking shoot. Got to avoid the 12g... dont want the send any of the frail ones to their new pasture with a loud crack at 7.00 am in the morning :lol::lol::lol::shoot:

 

 

Im not a new comer to shooting rooks in his manner and have shot branchers with a keper friend of mine for several years..... Great fun, and a lovely little snack in additon!!.... shallow fried in butter, straight off the breast......mmmm :P

 

 

Paul in North Lincs

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Quite right FM but it'll give me some continous shooting for years to come. Population control is the name of the this task, not total erradication. Aparently the trees cannot be touched as they are listed. (:shoot:??)

 

The grounds are mown and beatifully landscaped, it will make a cracking shoot. Got to avoid the 12g... dont want the send any of the frail ones to their new pasture with a loud crack at 7.00 am in the morning  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :shoot: 

 

 

Im not a new comer to shooting rooks in his manner and have shot branchers with a keper friend of mine for several years..... Great fun, and a lovely little snack in additon!!.... shallow fried in butter, straight off the breast......mmmm :P

 

 

Paul in North Lincs

If the trees are within the curtilege of a listed building they will have a Tree Preservation Order in force.

 

I too do a lot of Rook control each year, concentrating on the Flappers at the point of fledging.

 

I use a .22 cal Axor with a 12 x 56 Tasco Rangefinder and a BSA laser.. I find early Morning and Evening the best times when it is generally calmer.

 

As you say the young breasts are delicious.....

 

Good shooting.

 

FM.

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I am really looking at them from a pest controlers point of view but i don't like the idea that the young could starve to death as a result, but also the farm has got a lot of lambs that were late and the crows are pecking the hell out of them so i have been told, i think i might just wait and see what they want me to do because then i might do what you sudgetsted and shoot all the nests thanks

jason

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i think i might just wait and see what they want me to do because then i might do what you sudgetsted and shoot all the nests thanks

jason

Hi jason my comment about shooting out the nests was Hypothetical it wasnt meant as a suggestion.

 

Also Rooks are not to blame for attacking the lambs it would be Carrion Crows which are generally solitary birds and they are after the remains of the afterbirth hanging from new lambs.

 

Dont confuse the two species Rooks offer no danger to lambs or sheep They are the biggest pest at feeding troughs and pulling just sprouting grain in spring.

 

It isnt unusual to control Crow numbers by shooting out the nests but would be frowned apon by many to do this to rooks.

 

FM.

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HI GUYS SHOOT THE ROOKS MYSELF GLAD TO SEE OTHERS STILL DO IT THOUGHT I WAS ON MY OWN IN LINCOLNSHIRE.I FIND THE BEST WAY TO SHOOT ROOKS IS ON NEW DRILLING USING A FLOATER,I FIND THIS WAY I CAN SHOOT A LOT MORE ADULT BIRDS BEFORE THEY BREED. SHOT AFEW DECENT SIZE BAGS LIKE THAT ,THE MORE YOU SHOOT AND PUT OUT AS DECOYS THE MORE IT DRAWS THEM IN.

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I very much doubt if your crows will be dumb enough to come and play on a field near the rookery.You really need to find a field some way off where thay can't see whats going on and that they are using ..You need to be well hidden and let the ******* come in nice and close.Farmageddon

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i used a pecker and a floater in the field where the rookery was for a few hours and managed to bag 10. but they son got wind of it and ******** off. does anyone here climb the trees to get to the nests?

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