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martinj

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  1. You wouldn't know from the photo, he looks like a male version of Molly right down to the brown tinge to the coat
  2. Molly doing her thing: Lovely, Cocker?
  3. Archie lived in Dummer (not far from Micheldever in the grand scheme of things,) we used to take our pigeons to him on the back of a Lambretta in all weathers. He had a small shoot behind his house and another near Fleet where a mate of mine was his part time keeper (and still runs the Fleet shoot.)
  4. It depends if you want them going forwards or backwards
  5. All the recommendations I have seen have been to run them fast, mine only has one setting and that is fast-ish, probably for good reason A friend of mine who has been a pigeon guide for the last 40 years says to bring them in if the battery starts to die and it slows down, I'd trust his judgement but you have the controller, why not experiment and let us know the results.
  6. if they are not top notch what's wrong with using them for plinking? it's all part of the fun of airgun ownership. Slight (or even severe) oxidation will not render them useless (but don't lick your fingers ) I believe that the best pellets for accuracy are good quality domed pellets.
  7. This, I think, is the Sulphur polypore or "Chicken of the woods" the books say it's edible so I ate some, it does have the texture of chicken if you take some young bits, but tastes like cardboard and is best left on the tree in my opinion (despite what Hugh Fernley says!)
  8. Looks like Dryads Saddle, my wife found one growing from an old stump just like this https://www.wildfooduk.com/mushroom-guide/dryads-saddle/
  9. They give off a smell of rotting flesh to attract flies which spread the spores. They start life looking like jelly eggs which can be eaten before the horn appears
  10. There is a lot written on "Flinch" or call it what you want, I believe trigger freeze is just another manifestation. If you don't think it affects you, you may be surprised. Have you ever had a misfire and fallen forward because there was no recoil? Most "cures" involve reduction of recoil/noise and dry fire training. I use ear plugs and ear defenders to reduce noise, I haven't changed ammo yet but usually use mid range 28/30g depending on the targets. The only thing that works for me as previously stated, is dry fire training, the more often I do it the better the result.
  11. Yes, interesting. We hairy chested men aren't worried about a little bit of recoil are we? Naah! in recent years I have developed trigger freeze, I think I'm pulling the trigger but the brain says no so the gun doesn't fire when I think it should. This is costly during clay competitions where it will cost me a point or two which I can ill afford. On pigeons it will cost a couple of birds in a decoying session. My thoughts are that it might be age related, I'm 6ft and there's more than enough mass to absorb the recoil. I'm 69 so not as young as I was. I'm going to seek out softer cartridges, I have a few 32g clear pigeons to use up then it's 30g loads for pigeons. I have found this helps before a clay session - I put in the snap caps and swing the gun around my bedroom shooting along the lines where the ceiling and wall meet, five or ten minutes of this conditions my mind not to expect a thump every time I pull the trigger. It's usually effective over the course of a 100 birder (if I remember to do it)
  12. A refreshing post, I have trouble with those incomers too. My advice would be to enjoy your shooting and not put a number on it by counting the empties. Bruised shoulders are excusable but not ringing ears, maybe step up your hearing protection My theory about straight incomer is that we are always expecting them to deviate one way or another so we dither too long and mess up, in recent times I have had a little more success by putting the gun up when in range and firing straight at them without delay.
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