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tiercel

Lung worm in dogs

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As some on here know, I nearly lost my Gwp a few weeks back. It seems that the Lungworm that caused the damage was Angiostrongylus vasorum. This worm lives in the arteries of dogs and can cause similar symptoms to Congestive Heart Disease. They get the worm from slugs and snails. The vet has told me that parts of Wales and Cornwall are particular hotspots for the worm but it is slowly spreading to other parts of the country.

For more info on the worm please click on the link.

 

Have just found this site. My dog had the same symptoms as Bubbles but we caught it earlier. Hopefully there has been no lasting damage done.

 

Tiercel

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Thanks for the heads up TC. :)

 

This disease is now becoming something to look out for here in Canada as well, especially on the East Coast. For those of you that are not aware Lung Worm is actually another forum of canine heart worm. In Great Britain as of 2006 it has been catagorized as endemic in south-east England. It is a killer but can be controlled with a monthly worming program.

 

I would urge everyone to enquire at their vets about the proper wormer and dosage for this prevention.

 

My own dogs are on a monthly program to protect against Dirofilara immitis, heartworm, and from my reading I will be able to control Angiostrongylus vasorum Lung worm with the same program however come the new year I will be checking and cross referancing with my vet to be sure that my progam holds and updating it if need be.

 

NTTF

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Well doing a search for another member today I happened upon this post and thought it being spring it becomes a very relavent reminder.

 

Unfortunately TC's dog passed away last month due to complications of this disease. Many of the vets in the UK are not familar with Lung Worm or its exsistance. I strongly recommend everyone consulting their vet and getting their dogs on a once monthly preventative.

 

NTTF

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LB what worming regime did you have the dog on. If it was properly wormed with drontal or similar its probably unlikely

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Treatment/Control

 

There are no anthelmintics approved for use in the treatment of angiostrongylosis in dogs. Levamisole,fenbendazole and ivermectin have been used successfully to treat dogs infected with A. vasorum [7, 21, 23].The use of levamisole in dogs for the treatment of angiostrongylosis should be discontinued due to a lowtherapeutic index, potential side-effects and a presumed increased risk of post-treatment reactions due to itsrapid killing rate of the worms. Release of worm antigen causing an anaphylactic reaction was thought to bethe cause of hypovolemic shock in one A. vasorum infected dog after levamisole treatment [36]. Two doses ofivermectin (0.2 mg/kg) given subcutaneously one week apart has been reported to be effective for treatment ofA. vasorum. Fenbendazole has been used at a dosage regimen of 20 mg/kg, per os, given 1-2 times daily for2-3 weeks. Severe dyspnea and ascites may occur as post-treatment complications. Broncho-dilators,expectorants and diuretics may need to be administered due to these post-treatment reactions [4].Currently, premise application of molluscicides or fencing designed to exclude wild canids are not available aspractical control options. It is unknown whether any of the preventative anthelmintics designed for theprevention of Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs would also offer protection against A. vasorum. Sanitationto limit exposure of gastropods to feces of infected animals may prevent the spread of infection within akennel or multi-dog household. However, wild canids probably represent an infection reservoir beyond theeffects of human control measures.

 

 

 

 

We use an Ivermec wormer once a month to repell Canine Heartworm here. So unless you are on a monthly program of say "Heart Guard" .....one of the approved monthly wormers here.......then you are not preventing this problem.

 

LB, here are the Clinical Signs.

 

Clinical signs can be variable. Infections are usually characterized by a gradual onset of progressivelyworsening signs of respiratory and/or cardiac disease. Chronic cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, anorexia,gagging and weight loss are the most common clinical signs of infection. Subcutaneous swellings (hematomas), ascites, syncope, vomiting and signs of central nervous system disease may also occur. In rarecases, usually in younger dogs, an acute onset of illness followed by sudden death can occur. Occlusion of thepulmonary artery, acute onset of right-sided congestive heart failure and rupture of the femoral artery havebeen cited as the cause of death in these animals [21, 30, 32, 33].DiagnosisDiagnosis is based on history, clinical signs and the detection of first-stage larvae in fecal or transtrachealwash samples. Larvae are detected in feces using the Baermann technique or fecal flotation. Larvae are lessreliably detected on fecal flotation and may be difficult to identify due to osmotic damage from exposure tothe high specific gravity of the flotation media. The larvae are 310-399 x 14-16 microns in size. They have ananterior cephalic button and the tail terminates in a sinus wave curve ("severe kink") with a dorsal spine (Fig.3, Fig. 4). Immobilizing larvae with mild heat or the addition of a drop of iodine allows the diagnostician toperform a detailed morphological evaluation and obtain accurate size measurements. Multiple fecal samplesmay need to be examined to detect larvae due to intermittent shedding.Radiographs and hematological changes are nonspecific but may be supportive of a diagnosis ofangiostrongylosis in cases where fecal examinations are inconclusive. Radiographic changes include a diffuseincrease in peribronchial, interstitial and alveolar densities. Multiple nodular like densities may occur in theperipheral regions of the caudal lung lobes. Right-heart and pulmonary artery enlargement may also be visible[7, 21, 23, 34-35]. Hematological changes are inconsistent but may indicate anemia and monocytosis

 

 

 

NTTF

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LB what worming regime did you have the dog on. If it was properly wormed with drontal or similar its probably unlikely

 

 

al4x, I use drontal 4 times a year as dogs get to eat all sorts and sometimes live quarry :hmm:

 

Treatment/Control

 

There are no anthelmintics approved for use in the treatment of angiostrongylosis in dogs. Levamisole,fenbendazole and ivermectin have been used successfully to treat dogs infected with A. vasorum [7, 21, 23].The use of levamisole in dogs for the treatment of angiostrongylosis should be discontinued due to a lowtherapeutic index, potential side-effects and a presumed increased risk of post-treatment reactions due to itsrapid killing rate of the worms. Release of worm antigen causing an anaphylactic reaction was thought to bethe cause of hypovolemic shock in one A. vasorum infected dog after levamisole treatment [36]. Two doses ofivermectin (0.2 mg/kg) given subcutaneously one week apart has been reported to be effective for treatment ofA. vasorum. Fenbendazole has been used at a dosage regimen of 20 mg/kg, per os, given 1-2 times daily for2-3 weeks. Severe dyspnea and ascites may occur as post-treatment complications. Broncho-dilators,expectorants and diuretics may need to be administered due to these post-treatment reactions [4].Currently, premise application of molluscicides or fencing designed to exclude wild canids are not available aspractical control options. It is unknown whether any of the preventative anthelmintics designed for theprevention of Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs would also offer protection against A. vasorum. Sanitationto limit exposure of gastropods to feces of infected animals may prevent the spread of infection within akennel or multi-dog household. However, wild canids probably represent an infection reservoir beyond theeffects of human control measures.

 

 

 

 

We use an Ivermec wormer once a month to repell Canine Heartworm here. So unless you are on a monthly program of say "Heart Guard" .....one of the approved monthly wormers here.......then you are not preventing this problem.

 

LB, here are the Clinical Signs.

 

Clinical signs can be variable. Infections are usually characterized by a gradual onset of progressivelyworsening signs of respiratory and/or cardiac disease. Chronic cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, anorexia,gagging and weight loss are the most common clinical signs of infection. Subcutaneous swellings (hematomas), ascites, syncope, vomiting and signs of central nervous system disease may also occur. In rarecases, usually in younger dogs, an acute onset of illness followed by sudden death can occur. Occlusion of thepulmonary artery, acute onset of right-sided congestive heart failure and rupture of the femoral artery havebeen cited as the cause of death in these animals [21, 30, 32, 33].DiagnosisDiagnosis is based on history, clinical signs and the detection of first-stage larvae in fecal or transtrachealwash samples. Larvae are detected in feces using the Baermann technique or fecal flotation. Larvae are lessreliably detected on fecal flotation and may be difficult to identify due to osmotic damage from exposure tothe high specific gravity of the flotation media. The larvae are 310-399 x 14-16 microns in size. They have ananterior cephalic button and the tail terminates in a sinus wave curve ("severe kink") with a dorsal spine (Fig.3, Fig. 4). Immobilizing larvae with mild heat or the addition of a drop of iodine allows the diagnostician toperform a detailed morphological evaluation and obtain accurate size measurements. Multiple fecal samplesmay need to be examined to detect larvae due to intermittent shedding.Radiographs and hematological changes are nonspecific but may be supportive of a diagnosis ofangiostrongylosis in cases where fecal examinations are inconclusive. Radiographic changes include a diffuseincrease in peribronchial, interstitial and alveolar densities. Multiple nodular like densities may occur in theperipheral regions of the caudal lung lobes. Right-heart and pulmonary artery enlargement may also be visible[7, 21, 23, 34-35]. Hematological changes are inconsistent but may indicate anemia and monocytosis

 

 

 

NTTF

 

Ben has had no change in his manner/health Dan but after the blonde Dutch vet's analysis I am being as cautious as if it was one of my sons.

 

I am at a different vets after Easter, gundog specialists, so will see what they have to say.

 

I will contact TC and get his opinion over the weekend.

 

Thanks for the input chaps :/

 

 

 

LB

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over here we worm quarterly, does that not cover this specific worm

 

No!

 

Both K9 heartworm....transmitted by mosquitoes....Canada, USA.... and K9 Lung Worm....transmitted by snails and slugs......(not just the eating of the animal but the licking of residue left behind from paws etc.).....Canada, USA, UK.....Need to be controlled by a monthly worming program.

 

Over here we have commercial monthly wormers to target these Heart Guard is one. These are a soft chew that the dog will readily take once a month. Personnally I have calculated the dose of Ivermec sheep wormer needed for my dogs and do it that way.

 

NTTF

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There are wormers that kill Angiostrongylus Vasorum the lung worm we get here (also known as French heart worm)carried by slugs and snails. The one my vet recommended was Milbremax, Panacure kills the heart worm also. Drontol does not kill the heart worm.

I have now changed over to Milbremax for worming. Even though Milbremax is a prescription wormer you can buy it on line. You can ask your vet for a prescription and he has to by law provide it for you. The tablets cost £3.71 each on line and £7 from my vet.

 

If anyone has any particular quieries please pm me and I will help if I can.

 

TC

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This is my first attempt at an entry so I hope it comes out in the right place.

 

Lung Worms in Dogs.

 

I read with interest all of your information on Lung Worms in Dogs. As I have had both sheep and cattle, I am fully aware of the dangers of lung worms but was unaware that my dog could catch them. We have a beautiful standard poodle. She has often had a cough and 'gagged' which has always been diagnosed as kennel cough. Recently, I noticed her staggering, she was unwell and drinking lots of water. The vet diagnosed pyrometra and she immediately had a hysterectomy. On arriving home, I was horrified to find that she was gushing blood and by the time we arrived at the vets, she was unconscious, lying in a growing pool of blood. She was re-operated on immediately and diagnosed as a 'doggy haemophiliac'. We thought she would die but she was saved by a blood transfusion from a lab, which enabled her blood to clot. We are delighted to have her back with us. We have just spent two weeks in Cornwall and walk her on Upton Towans which is absolutely covered in slugs and snails. She acquired a hacking cough and was again treated with antibiotics for kennel cough. The vet thought she had a heart murmur also. This morning, she has had her vaccinations and the vet mentioned that they had had a discussion about her case and thought it may all be caused by lung worms and I am concerned that she receives the correct tests and treatment. So, thank you for your help.

 

I note that one of you mentioned adjusting the Ivomec dose for dogs. She is about 25k. I seem to remember that the dog wormer is twice the strength of the sheep one. Advice gratefully received. I see her new wormer is Milbemax which I think one of you mentioned, one tab now and another in 3 months.

 

Thank you.

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