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enfieldspares

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  1. Take one hundred of the cartridges you intend for the pheasant. To take less is to risk running out mid-day and that is unforgivable. I've seen it once...two pegs down from me...and although laughter and banter greeted it the truth is it wasn't well received. You don't actually have to take all one hundred to each peg but do at least have them where you can top up between pegs. Twenty-five to thirty in your pockets on a peg is reasonable enough. For the duck that's a pain in the bottom as, IMHO, as it commits you if fibre to forking out for a box of bismuth even if on the day you get a blank on that duck stand. Shot size of your English #6 is good to go although if expecting woodcock and your chokes are open (as they will be best as such on the day) then maybe 1 ounce of good quality English #7.
  2. I actually did find that Eley's green paper cased English copper plated shot #6 was disappointing in my very open bored 12 Bore. I think that premium cartridges, perversely, have a role in clay shooting where premium shot will give a better pattern, an even pattern and give more visible kills. That one pellet chipped on the edge clay becomes a two pellet broken into three clay. In game shooting I find that shot size makes more difference than shot quality. That's to say not too good English #6 in lead will always kill better than the most perfect shaped and graded English #5 or English #4 in the same payload weight of 1 1/16 ounce or 1 ounce. And on woodcock English #7 in 1 ounce trumps all! If I had my time again I'd shoot 1 ounce of English #6 1/2.
  3. To me the thing with the external splines looks similar to the tool used to remove the freewheel hub from the rear wheel of a bicycle. Yet, in truth it should then have a hex nut shaped end. Like this. They come in all sorts of lengths and styles but all will have a splined (male) exterior surface. My thoughts are it is some sort of unlocking tool (male) for a security lock (female). That simply works by engaging in female lock that is cut to receive and engage with the (male) splines. IT now gets all "Joytech" and "loose balls" for here on! https://intheknowcycling.com/product/specialized-joytech-loose-ball-freehub-11-speed-s192100007/
  4. It is a shotgun reloading powder. There was also an #82. Somewhere on eBay or in someone's loft there will be recipes for it. Pretty much none of them will be of great use as they will all be in cases of a construction no longer made with primers of a type no longer in current manufacture. A bit pessimistic but my advice is never, never, never use old powder that has come from an auction. It may contain Shotgun 79. It may not!
  5. It is a shotgun reloading powder. There was also an #82. Somewhere on eBay or in someone's loft there will be recipes for it. Pretty much none of them will be of great use as they will all be in cases of a construction no longer made with primers of a type no longer in current manufacture. A bit pessimistic but my advice is never, never, never use old powder that has come from an auction. It may contain Shotgun 79. It may not!
  6. In theory using a 70mm case in a gun with a 76mm or 89mm chamber isn't good as gas will escape around the wad which could then, possibly, lead to the shot patterning badly. However that does depend IMHO on if the wad is able to bridge the gap (in other words long enough to seal the extra leed). In practical terms hundreds, nay thousands of 2 3/4" cartridges were used (and indeed true 2 1/2" cartridges not today's 67.5mm types) in the old English 3" guns with no practical lesser performance. But as to using a 2 1/2" (or 67mm) cartridge in an 89mm chambered gun I can make no useful input. I don't know. What a longer case does...often much overlooked...is allow larger diameter shot to be loaded with a crimp closure where in a shorter cartridge you'd have to use a roll turnover. So that's what? That's mostly lettered shot such as the the old English SG and LG sizes. But I think it'd have merit if you were handloading say BB or AAA for your geese, yes. Or in the future shot that is of a less dense mass than lead which therefore must be of larger diameter to achieve "an equivalent weight" of a lesser diameter lead shot.
  7. Did you mishear him? And what he actually said was that it was totally manic? LOL!
  8. Banana. I've been told that too. Good film was that.
  9. Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither. Or some such said Benjamin Franklin.
  10. I use a simple sterile saline solution dripped in using the bottle's nozzle. It costs but £2 from the chemist in the next village. Or with a teat pipette you could make your own or just sniff it up. https://www.ouh.nhs.uk/patient-guide/leaflets/files/110811nasaldouching.pdf
  11. I would be interested in a comparison of all these recent guns with the old, rare, Laporte over and under.
  12. I often wondered about Powell's system. I did buy a 3" BLE from Powell's when David and Peter still were very much in charge at the Carr's Lane shop. Yet odd although you'd often see their fine 12/20 (and wow did I want one of those once) I never saw nor handled any gun with their lift up lever. Is it that bad then? It looks as if it would be "handy" so I'm guessing that it's not wet and cold thumb friendly then?
  13. Lucky not too have owned or used one long term IMHO. I have and gladly took up the option to return it within the vendors fourteen day "cooling off" period. The Westley top lever and dollshead is an inferior and clumsy system to the much superior and neater Scott spindle. If it were any good it would have been adopted by the main "best" makers long ago.
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