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6 minutes ago, islandgun said:

My bread making machine, I'm up to 6 courses but struggling 😟, Its a dome and ive shaped sand as a former at the top to finish but its not very neat

DSCN2812.JPG.8f0b1b6289c44428326429a220e76a05.JPG

Is that a bread/pizza oven ?

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Just now, islandgun said:

Yes mate ...err when i finish it

Good luck 🤞 Just a thought,,,, the intense heat may cause those perforated bricks to explode/shatter 🤔

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Just now, JKD said:

Good luck 🤞 Just a thought,,,, the intense heat may cause those perforated bricks to explode/shatter 🤔

The bricks are really there to hold up 200-300mm covering of perlite/ vermiculite concrete, which then store the heat, i hope your not right !.. also the holes are filled as you lay the next course

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1 minute ago, islandgun said:

The bricks are really there to hold up 200-300mm covering of perlite/ vermiculite concrete, which then store the heat, i hope your not right !.. also the holes are filled as you lay the next course

Righto 😉 I don't think those bricks are fireproof/heat resistant though. You'd have been better off using solids 👍

It's the thinness and any air pockets that will cause any failures 🙄

Fireproof cement also ? Not trying to criticise or teach you how to suck eggs BTW 🙂 To do all that work and for it to not function properly would be disastrous 😐

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24 minutes ago, JKD said:

Righto 😉 I don't think those bricks are fireproof/heat resistant though. You'd have been better off using solids 👍

It's the thinness and any air pockets that will cause any failures 🙄

Fireproof cement also ? Not trying to criticise or teach you how to suck eggs BTW 🙂 To do all that work and for it to not function properly would be disastrous 😐

Cheers, very good points.. The bricks are engineering bricks, I can only get two types of brick on the Island, pressed concrete [solid] or these and assumed that a fired clay brick would be better than a concrete, [would have preferred a solid reclaim though] Im not a bricklayer so any advice is welcome, most trusted info ive seen suggest that you dont need fire cement. arguing that masonry ovens have been around a lot longer than specialised cement !. 

Edit to say Maybe I should take it down and fill the voids with fire cement or perlite

Edited by islandgun
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39 minutes ago, islandgun said:

Cheers, very good points.. The bricks are engineering bricks, I can only get two types of brick on the Island, pressed concrete [solid] or these and assumed that a fired clay brick would be better than a concrete, [would have preferred a solid reclaim though] Im not a bricklayer so any advice is welcome, most trusted info ive seen suggest that you dont need fire cement. arguing that masonry ovens have been around a lot longer than specialised cement !. 

Edit to say Maybe I should take it down and fill the voids with fire cement or perlite

Didn't know you couldn't get all materials easily where you are 🙁 Can't comment on how things were done in the past, only from my own experiences 😉 Also, fire-cement has been used for years in modern building, usually where direct flame contact is expected 👍

This [see picture of only a small section of the wall] perforated engineering brick wall was destroyed by a "bbq-coals-into-the-wheeliebin" fire,,,, this was after cleaning to show the full extent of the damage. The mortar was quite strong, surprisingly, and also shattered in the heat.

 

 

IMG_20210116_141011.jpg

1 minute ago, GingerCat said:

Well spotted. I used the green garlic stuffed olive sort. 

Well that sounds delicious also 😁 Might try some bread making soon, after reading this thread 😛

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I used solid engineering bricks to line a 55 gallon barrel when building mine. Stuck on with fire cement. The base is pearlite and cement with a 5/1 mix. I then used terracotta floor tiles as the floor to cook on, onto of the pearlite that runs up the edge of the barrel to help the bricks stay in place.

The outside of the drum has 2 inches of pearlite and cement and this was rendered so I could paint. The thermal mass of the bricks is necessary if you want to cook longer and lower after firing. If its just lizzas and things you just need to get it hot. 

Mine runs up to about 1150.c and has been fine. Don't rush the drying process and expect some cracks on the render. 

Edited by GingerCat
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1 minute ago, JKD said:

Didn't know you couldn't get all materials easily where you are 🙁 Can't comment on how things were done in the past, only from my own experiences 😉 Also, fire-cement has been used for years in modern building, usually where direct flame contact is expected 👍

This [see picture of only a small section of the wall] perforated engineering brick wall was destroyed by a "bbq-coals-into-the-wheeliebin" fire,,,, this was after cleaning to show the full extent of the damage. The mortar was quite strong, surprisingly, and also shattered in the heat.

 

 

IMG_20210116_141011.jpg

Cheers, The engineering bricks i have are smooth and not porous [ very hard].. Im wondering about putting a piece in my multi burner stove and seeing what happens to it.

 

4 minutes ago, GingerCat said:

I used solid engineering bricks to line a 55 gallon barrel when building mine. Stuck on with fire cement. The base is pearlite and cement with a 5/1 mix. I then used terracotta floor tiles as the base.

The outside of the drum has 2 inches of pearlite and cement and this was rendered so I could paint. The thermal mass of the bricks is necessary if you want to cook longer and lower after firing. If its just lizzas and things you just need to get it hot. 

Mine runs up to about 1150.c and has been fine. Don't rush the drying process and expect some cracks on the render. 

great stuff, any photo's, I assume you laid them with the barrel up side down then when the mortar had gone off turned it around and put in the floor, how about the flue ?

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10 minutes ago, islandgun said:

Cheers, The engineering bricks i have are smooth and not porous [ very hard].. Im wondering about putting a piece in my multi burner stove and seeing what happens to it.

The quality of bricks nowadays isn't what they once were 🙄 Also there are different grades and qualities of brick manufacture. The denser of the material the more heat resistant it should be. Try your brick in the burner, but I'm sure it will crack/shatter as they are thin all round 👍 Solid engineering bricks is the way to go 😉

Sorry if that's not what you want to hear 😕

BTW, that wall was an insurance claim I inspected 😅

Edited by JKD
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48 minutes ago, islandgun said:

Cheers, The engineering bricks i have are smooth and not porous [ very hard].. Im wondering about putting a piece in my multi burner stove and seeing what happens to it.

 

great stuff, any photo's, I assume you laid them with the barrel up side down then when the mortar had gone off turned it around and put in the floor, how about the flue ?

That is exactly how I did it. Lots of pics, not sure how to post them. The flu is a clay drainage pipe. 

 

20200925_174357.jpg

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Islandgun,,,, Just found your thread on this subject from September last year,,,, perhaps get that going again ? I must have missed it first time round 😐

Edited by JKD
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1 hour ago, GingerCat said:

That is exactly how I did it. Lots of pics, not sure how to post them. The flu is a clay drainage pipe. 

 

20200925_174357.jpg

Love it, thats with 2" of cladding, is the cladding hot ? ..... your merlot should be just right

 

1 hour ago, JKD said:

The quality of bricks nowadays isn't what they once were 🙄 Also there are different grades and qualities of brick manufacture. The denser of the material the more heat resistant it should be. Try your brick in the burner, but I'm sure it will crack/shatter as they are thin all round 👍 Solid engineering bricks is the way to go 😉

Sorry if that's not what you want to hear 😕

BTW, that wall was an insurance claim I inspected 😅

Ive put a corner of brick in my multi stove and shall see if its still there in the a.m.

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I should add i can't lay a brick for toffee let alone cut one so it was a bit of an adventure and exercise in "making it work" during building. The whole thing was made with bits laying about the garden bar the fire cement for the inside if the oven which cost 46 quid and the sand/cement and pearlite came to about 60 quid.

The outside of the render doesn't get over 50.c and is just warm to touch. 

A laser thermometer was a godsend. 

The render is probably an inch on top of the 2 inch of pearlite. Pearlite is remarkable stuff. Its an insulator though and I don't think it stores the heat in the way bricks or sand will do. That thermal mass is critical for longer cooking but unimportant if thats not of interest. Things like pizza and steak etc won't need it. A roast dinner however will. And you will want a roast dinner on it as the flavour it adds is quite fantastic. You may need to learn to cook again though as its a bit different and requires lots of wine and a few minutes thought. 

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2 minutes ago, GingerCat said:

I should add i can't lay a brick for toffee let alone cut one so it was a bit of an adventure and exercise in "making it work" during building. The whole thing was made with bits laying about the garden bar the fire cement for the inside if the oven which cost 46 quid and the sand/cement and pearlite came to about 60 quid.

The outside of the render doesn't get over 50.c and is just warm to touch. 

A laser thermometer was a godsend. 

brilliant ! does the door get a bit hot ? heres a pic of my attempt up to a while ago,  perhaps weve derailed this thread enough i will look out the other..

DSCN2824.JPG.f52cf42df421439e0c1a9951228c6f78.JPG

 

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Looking excellent. You'll bake some bread in there for sure. 

The door gets hot if shut  but the oven doesn't loose heat with it open so I only shut it when not in use to prevent the cat from finding somewhere to curl up. 

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Pizza ovens are one of the best / most social things you can cook with, just like a BBQ but not everyone has one! 

Many Saturday pizza evenings followed by a slow roast lamb leg the following day. 

Mine isn’t home made, in fact was a wedding gift but either way gets a fair amount of use! 

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31 minutes ago, oscarsdad said:

That is going to be spring project, a woodfired oven in the garden. Maybe one day will be able to have people come over and cook stuff for them in it! 

Do it, you won’t regret it! 
 

Hopefully soon enough we will be able to have people over again! In fact it has been COVID that has stopped us using the oven, it’s too much work for just the two of us, so until it’s over it will sit unused.

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1 minute ago, D_shooter said:

Do it, you won’t regret it! 
 

Hopefully soon enough we will be able to have people over again! In fact it has been COVID that has stopped us using the oven, it’s too much work for just the two of us, so until it’s over it will sit unused.

Did you design your own or use a kit? Sorry saw you said ready made. 

Edited by oscarsdad
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