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markyboy07

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About markyboy07

  • Birthday March 1

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  • Gender
    Male
  • From
    Berkshire
  • Interests
    Shootin, fishin and boatin!

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  1. I struggled down here as well south east, managed to get a click and collect through homebase in the end.
  2. Thanks walked up, I will have a look at that.
  3. Thanks ditchman, my mum suggested the yoghurt trick, I've heard of it but never seen what it actually does. Will have a look and see, some suggest painting and you can also add a die to the cement at the start of the process.
  4. I have always been fascinated with bonsai trees, recently I have tried making a few out of conifers bought from a local garden centre. Some have turned out quite well and ive even managed to sell some on e bay to help fund my hobby. Whilst out on my boat the other day I found a small tree growing underneath the road bridge, it had somehow started to grow in a crack in the concrete and was being watered by the wash generated by passing boats. Because of this it had formed a very interesting exposed root formation and was perfect for a bonsai. I know you shouldn't really take trees from the wild but due to the location of this tree it was only a matter of time before it became a nuisance and would be pulled out by the environment agency or broken by a passing boat. So I decided to rescue it and managed to remove it without causing any damage to the roots. I returned home and made up a quick temporary pot out of some wood I had lying around. As you can see it is a lovely little tree with a lot of potential. I think it is a Poplar tree? Maybe someone can confirm or correct that for me. I knew i was going to need a proper pot soon and didn't fancy buying one as it needs to be around 3ft long and 18” wide so I had a look on you tube to see if it was possible to make one. After a few hours of research I thought I would have a go. I purchased some sand and cement, made up a rotating table out of scrap wood and a wheel of an old band saw and made a former from some brass plate. I started by making the sand mould, I used a cut up camping matt to act as a guide and a couple of pieces of wood to act as screed bars. I made another former out of plywood to shape the sides of the mould. I then knocked up some sand and cement I used a 1:1 mix ( I later realised I should have used 2 parts sand) and started to apply to the mould. I added some baking parchment as i was worried that the cement would stick to the wood. I added some wire to give it some strength I then kept running the former around the pot and then adding some more cement to the low spots and repeating the process until a smooth finish was achieved. after that i sprinkled dry cement powder onto the pot and went around with the former again, im not sure quite what this does? but all the videos i watched they did this. I think it creates a smoother finish. i also should have mixed cement and water and gone over with that for the final finish but in all the excitement i forgot that stage. I added some drainage holes using a length of 32mm copper pipe and some smaller holes for wiring down the trunk/roots until the tree takes hold. I then had to wait 24 hours for the cement to cure, after this i gently eased the pot from the foam matt and scraped out the sand. Its not perfect but its pretty good and im really pleased for a first attempt and apart from some time it cost me around 5 quid. I've been doing some more research and i now realise that i have to let the cement cure some more, i need to put it in a damp bin bag for 2 - 4 weeks keeping the bag damp. Apparently if you don't do this it will crack a few weeks after planting in it?? You also need to be careful as some concrete mixes are either high in alkaline or acid and this needs to neutralised by soaking in water or water and vinegar mixes, some sites suggest that you need to do this for months???? otherwise the unpredictable PH level can affect you plants. So a bit more homework needed before i plant in this pot. i will try some more pots and try to achieve a smoother finish, but to be honest i quite like the rustic charm that this one has.
  5. A friend of mine is wanting to start his 9 year old boy shooting he tried a 410 a couple of weeks ago and he loved it. Can you tell me the LOP on the junior wood work and the weight when fitted please? Also do you think it would suit a 9 year old? Or is this a bit to big? I know this is difficult to say as all kids are different but I would say he is of average build.
  6. I have one and get on ok with it. There are quite a few you tube vids offering tips which I watched prior to use and the main jist was to use the same amount of strokes each side and keep going until a burr has formed before swapping sides
  7. My friend bought a metal shed similar to that, it was very flimsy and fell apart during a storm in the first year of purchase.
  8. Im planning on making something similar, my mate has a load of old fire extinguishers that i was hoping to chop up and stick together for the flue. Not sure if they are suitable or if there is a safe way of removing the valve though. anyone ever dismantled an extinguisher before??
  9. This looks like a good size bench lathe. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Metal-Lathe-Myford-A5-V-belt-conversion-/254843995231?_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49292
  10. I'd love a lathe also and have been keeping an eye out for one at the right price. Facebook market place has had some real bargains but you have to be quick as the good stuff doesn't hang around long. I think some of the myford lathes are small enough to go on a bench but not t up on the model names. Drummond was another one that maybe suitable
  11. Ive been itching to have a go at damascus steel for a while now. i did try once before by hand and got as far as setting the initial welds but they started to open up whilst drawing out. So this is the first proper attempt using my hydraulic press. I started by cutting two different types of steel to size i used 15N20 and 1095. i then stacked them up and welded the billet at each end. Before heating up I soaked the billet in parrafin, this helps reduce oxidisation during the heating process, as well as having a reducing flame and using borax before the billet is red hot. So I bought it up to forge welding temperature and set the welds, i did this three times just quick presses and then back in the heat to make sure everthing has stuck. I wanted to create feather pattern damascus which was probably a bit ambitious for a first try but Ive seen lots of videos and read a lot of articles on the process so was fairly confident ( famous last words). After i was sure i had a solid billet i rotated it 90 degrees so that the layers were now sitting vertically rather than horizontally rounded the corners and drew it out. cut it into three and re stacked and welded it together. I cut of the end and dipped into a mixture of ferric chloride and water to show the pattern so far. you can see how the layers are horizontal and the corners are rounded. when this is stacked again it will start to form a W pattern. repeated the same process of heating, boraxing setting the welds, drawing out and cutting and re stacking. This is the W pattern starting to form. repeated the process again. I cut the billet into 4 this time so thats now 36 layers. repeat same process again. Feather pattern is a mosiac style damascus which means before drawing it out for the last time it is cut into tiles stacked up tall and then flattened out to reveal the pattern that was hidden internally. With feather pattern you also have to split it down the middle and then re weld together, this seam that is formed is meant to look like the center or the quill of the feather. Stacked into 7 so now at 252 layers. I made this out of an old cross pein hammer i had for splitting the billet. Now up until this point everything had gone smoothly, I'd had no trouble reaching welding temperature and all welds had gone really well. The next bit all went a bit wrong, I think it was a combination of being slightly low on gas and how tall the stacked billet was. I had trouble setting the initial welds which meant the billet ended up being a lot flatter and squarer than I intended, i didnt get any photos of this process as i was pulling my hair out a bit trying to rectify the problem. i eventually got it welded, split down the middle and re welded back together again. i then drew the billet out and dipped in the ferric chloride to see the pattern. I was really pleased with the way it looked, although it wasnt exactly what i had intended it was still a great pattern. But....I dont know if you can see them but unfortunately there were quite a few cracks all along the billet which made it pretty much scrap. But i thought sod it and started to make it knife like anyway just to see what might have been. This was back in September, and since then have been working on some other projects that i will put up at some point, will also have another go at this in the next few weeks ensuring that i have enough gas to get the job done properly and hopefully end up with a crack free knife.
  12. I have a record power bench mounted pillar drill. I use it for drilling metal and wood and it has had no trouble with either. I use 20mm drill bits with small shafts on mild steel and with some spray and patience it is more than capable. I was gifted the drill by a friend so unsure of the price I'll check the model tomorrow And put it on here.
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