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Delwint

Dog whining on the peg

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    Has anyone any ideas how I could stop my lab whining whilst on the peg. It’s off putting to me and possibly to other guns. It’s not overly loud but it’s someshing she’s started and I’d like to put a stop to it ASAP!!  

    Atb delwint 

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    As above have known people to carry a bottle of water in their pocket, with a small hole in and squirt the dog while it is doing it.

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    Sorry you’re dogs a problem 

    you don’t say it’s age or when it started? 

    Usualy occures when you’re basic sitting and steadiness are not very good and dog is not mentally prepared for its time in the field 

    im sure someone will come up with a idea that’ll work for you 

    all the best 

    of 

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    Old farrier she’s 4, steady as a rock and never moves from her peg, shot the last 2 seasons and has been fine. She started whining last week and yesterday she did it again. Sits all day in a hide with me when we’re pigeon and crow shooting and don’t hear a peep unless someone walks across the fields and then she will bark but I accept that.

    And I have read people mention a water bottle/spray 

    atb delwint 

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    On 30/01/2018 at 19:44, Delwint said:

    Old farrier she’s 4, steady as a rock and never moves from her peg, shot the last 2 seasons and has been fine. She started whining last week and yesterday she did it again. Sits all day in a hide with me when we’re pigeon and crow shooting and don’t hear a peep unless someone walks across the fields and then she will bark but I accept that.

    And I have read people mention a water bottle/spray 

    atb delwint 

    Unless someone walks across the field!!! 

    And you accept that

    And on the peg it can see someone everywhere and you don’t want it to bark or whine 

    can you see what the problem is? 

     

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    My strategy would be a toe in the ribs. Not hard, but enough to get her attention. Then a verbal command to wisht. If she starts again, another toe with a bit more encouragement behind it......rinse and repeat as required . Eventually she'll get the message.

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    20 minutes ago, Retsdon said:

    My strategy would be a toe in the ribs. Not hard, but enough to get her attention. Then a verbal command to wisht. If she starts again, another toe with a bit more encouragement behind it......rinse and repeat as required . Eventually she'll get the message.

    That is very poor advice. Anyone who resorts to those tactics has failed the dog training test.

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    2 hours ago, JDog said:

    That is very poor advice. Anyone who resorts to those tactics has failed the dog training test.

    Wait. So you have no issue with compressed air cans, E collars, spraying the dog with water, and what all else, but a nudge with the foot is ' very poor advice'?  I used to train border collies to trialling standard, and ran a couple of those dogs in the national championships. so I don't think I've 'failed the dog training test' whatever that is. Understand,  I'm not talking about kicking the dog. I'm saying attract her attention - pointedly. The dog was steady and silent, but has picked up the habit of whining. She's not a pup. The dog has to understand that this new whining business s a no-no. It's not complicated. It's  like training a horse. Exert pressure, and when you get the desired response, release the pressure. The dog whines, poke it and tell it to stop. The dog whines again, tell it to stop, and if it doesn't listen, poke it again. It wines again, tell it to stop etc,.  Eventually the dog should get the message that if it doesn't want to get poked it needs to revert to staying quiet. The dog was quiet before, it can be quiet again. It's not like you're training a dog to run tighter or wider on a blind 1,000 yard outrun - this is basic stuff that's hardly even classifiable under the  'training' category. It's  just conditioning basic manners. That said, there should always be a plan B. And if it looks like plan A might be headed towards failure, an alternative would be to walk the dog to release the pressure of excitement  that's causing it to whine. Either way it's pressure and release. My first choice though would be the toe poke, because I believe that a dog should do what it's told when it's told and be conditioned accordingly even if it's not of a mind to follow instructions.nBut then again, my dog-training mentor was the late Bill Bremner, so I suppose my approach and prespective is a bit old-school by modern standards. 

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    On 28/02/2018 at 21:48, JDog said:

    That is very poor advice. Anyone who resorts to those tactics has failed the dog training 

    On 30/01/2018 at 21:04, Delwint said:

    Has anyone any ideas how I could stop my lab whining whilst on the peg. It’s off putting to me and possibly to other guns. It’s not overly loud but it’s someshing she’s started and I’d like to put a stop to it ASAP!!  

    Atb delwint 

    I should have mentioned  - before doing anyfhing else, try simply talking to the dog. It's anticipation that's making her whine. You might be able to relieve the pressure of the anticipation by just chatting to her. 

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    I do talk to her, shut the **** up lol 😂 

    And I have given her a little tap in the ribs with the heel of the opposite leg  that she’s stood next to. Back to basics again I think 😳

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    On 3/3/2018 at 01:41, Delwint said:

    I do talk to her, shut the **** up lol 😂 

    And I have given her a little tap in the ribs with the heel of the opposite leg  that she’s stood next to. Back to basics again I think 😳

    That's funny! No, I was thinking more along the lines of  just talking to the dog - perhaps before she starts to whine. It's the anticipation that's making her do it and talking to a dog definitely calms it down.  The aim would be to switch her attention to a different place. The weather,  the scenery, whatever topic comes to mind - just talk quietly to her about anything at all to get her to listen to you, rather than think about the upcoming drive. If her attention goes back to the upcoming drive and she starts whining  - try a quiet- ' hush now, there's a good girl..it's alright...calm down...why are you getting all bothered,,no birds due over for ages yet...etc,etc, and a little nudge at the same time. The nudge is there to show her than you're not asking her - you're telling her. One thing is to try not to compound the excitement by raising your voice or hissing angrily, because it's easy to get sucked into this spiral of annoyance on your part compounding anxiety/excitement on the dog's part and so on and so forth, until eventually the wheels come off altogether. We've all been there...

    Year ago, I as I said above, I used to train border collies and run them in trails, and I had the good luck to spend quite a lot of time in the company of some very, very good handlers and trainers both at trails and just messing around training and practicing on each other's sheep and ground. And one of the things that  always impressed me about nearly all the top guys is how quietly they work their dogs and how calm the relationship is between man and dog. And it's a style of dog-management that I really would try to emulate. Of course, gundogs are generally less tractable and sensitive than collies so they'll take more yelling and  what not before everything goes pear-shaped but even so, the quietly spoken or murmured command is the goal to aim for - especially with a dog that can 'lose the heid' as they say in Scotland. But as I also said above, quiet doesn't necessarily mean soft. The dog is still supposed to do what it's told  - and must know it. But if one thing doesn't work - try something else. That's the fun of dog training- solving problems.

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    back to basic training in the off season and from a dogs point of view a total trust in you as a handler to question you on any retrieve  so pick up 9 out of 10 dummies yourself or work with other dogs to instill wait your turn 

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