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sandspider

Good wood primer for wood that's previously been painted and is damp for a good half the year?

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Hi all

As above - any suggestions, please? (Wooden conservatory and window frames in a damp Welsh valley!)

A professional painted the window frames in question with (I think) a specialist paint by Zinsser, and it lifted off after a few months. Though the paint was applied to bare wood, no primer, which I thought was odd, but the joiner said it would be OK. It wasn't!

Thanks.

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Chop out the rot, make fillers from good wood and use an exterior grade filler to smooth, prime and a good external paint to seal.

This sort of thing;

https://www.screwfix.com/p/ronseal-high-performance-wood-filler-white-550g/45077?kpid=45077&ds_kid=92700048793315993&ds_rl=1249416&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2ZzX6cum6gIVB7LtCh3XFg_AEAQYAyABEgJ7b_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

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Hello, gone are the days  of knotting wood, pink primer, undercoat and oil based top coat, if the timber is damp prior to painting it will lift off,  and these all in one paints ??? once the old paint has been cleaned off, have a Google on using aluminium paint, then a good oil based paint, keep the conservatory covered in between work, for windows I use to cover with polythene roll 

 

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If the wood is damp prior to painting then nothing will stick to it. It needs to be thoroughly dry, and I mean old bone dry. 
Not many professionals use wood primer to be honest, but a good one is Dulux Weatheshield Preservative Primer; it’s blue nowadays, looks like paraffin. Follow the instructions and wipe off excess.
Then undercoat with a good external trade quality paint ( I always undercoat twice ) before applying the same in top coat. 
If your conservatory is prone to expanding in summer and contracting in winter then the best you can hope for really is two to three years before the paint film will start to crack. 
If it does crack then it’s best to peel off the flaking paint even if it means exposing the wood, as capillary action draws rain through cracks where it sits under the paint and slowly rots your wood as it never dries out, even in good weather. 
If you can get the wood back to being bare, then you could apply the applicable Osmo product to it or something suitable by Sikkens or one of the other Scandinavian wood products. 

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As Scully Says! Spot on advise! It should be pinned. It would save folk a lot of grief. Dulux Weathershield Preservative Primer a great product. . . . . Would only add you can use a heat gun to help dry out persistently damp areas. End grain,joints etc. Don't over do it! Apply heat, let it work and keep coming back to it. If repairing rot use wood hardener to treat area before using a good flexible 2 pack filler. Filtite a good product. Hardener can be used on end grain and joints and on new timber repairs if no preservative primer. Stick to oil based products! Unfortunately if bottoms of sills and frames edges were not treated, primed or sealed before assembly they will still suck up damp behind any coating however well applied. Timber framed conservatories are notorious for seasonal  expansion and contraction. Check frequently and touch in if necessary, and as Scully says 3 years max for redec. Make sure any sealing/joint compound disturbed/removed during prep is reapplied. Another good product we used to use a lot on conservatories is Architectural Solignum. 

 I don't miss having to use pink primer or cream undercoat to show how many coats you had applied on contract work. Or bitumening out cast iron and asbestos guttering come to that. Gone of the days of a clark of the works using a mirror on a stick to check you had done the back of pipes, or a hydromoeter to check the thickness of your paint. Always seemed to turn up on lunch times to  NB

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9 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Chop out the rot, make fillers from good wood and use an exterior grade filler to smooth, prime and a good external paint to seal.

This sort of thing;

https://www.screwfix.com/p/ronseal-high-performance-wood-filler-white-550g/45077?kpid=45077&ds_kid=92700048793315993&ds_rl=1249416&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2ZzX6cum6gIVB7LtCh3XFg_AEAQYAyABEgJ7b_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

I used Ronseal wood filler for many years, found it very easy to achieve a smooth surface, took paint very well ..... BUT .... the filler was inflexible, whereas the surrounding timber would shrink and swell with the changing seasons, allowing moisture into the cracks and causing the paint to lift.   Possibly something wrong with my technique?

Anyway, about three years ago I started using Repair Care Dry-Flex, which seems to have produced much more durable repairs.   We'll see how it performs in the longer term.   Hope it proves to be durable, because it was an awful lot more expensive than the Ronseal.

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I'm not sure. Some sort of tropical hardwood I think, quite possibly iroko or similar.

The conservatory is 20 plus years old and not in great shape. I'll do what I can to delay the inevitable!

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48 minutes ago, sandspider said:

I'm not sure. Some sort of tropical hardwood I think, quite possibly iroko or similar.

The conservatory is 20 plus years old and not in great shape. I'll do what I can to delay the inevitable!

Hello, Iroko was very popular for windows and conservatories 20/ 30 years ago, not likely to rot but if painted a one coat paint would lift off if not having a good base coat, or it was damp before painting, hot air gun/ scrapers and sander to get the old flakey paint off then would only need a undercoat and top coat, quick drying paints might help as keeping covered at night, good luck

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33 minutes ago, sandspider said:

Any thoughts on dulux trade ultimate opaque? Supposed to be better than the weathershield preservative, apparently?

Yes, it’s good stuff. You can even paint over existing paint with it if I recall, although I’d give it a good key first, then apply a couple of coats. 
Your wood still needs to be completely dry however, before applying. 

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I have a 2.5 litre tin of white paint in my outside store. It says in big letters MAGNET LEAD UNDERCOAT. Anything that I ever painted with it before 1992 has never needed painting again. Which..paint once and forget...I expect is a lot better for the environment that these new paints that have to be redone every five years.

Edited by enfieldspares

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