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Just spent a very enjoyable morning with a retired butcher learning how to make pork pies from scratch, I’m seriously looking forward to trying it once it’s cooled down.

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1 minute ago, Medic1281 said:

Eat it warm! Nothing better! 

I know what you mean mate, as it’s my first attempt I want to try it cool in (hopefully) all it’s glory.  I mighght cook another one of the remaining 6 I’ve got for the freezer and have that warm tomorrow 😀

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There isn’t much better than a warm pork pie that dribbles down your chin when you bite it.

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Posted (edited)

Working that hot water pastry is fun too.  Looks like you made a very good first attempt.   I haven't made full out pork pies but my game pies are made on the same prinicipal and almost always contain some pork, usuall belly pork to help keep the game meats moist.  You've started something and I am going to have to give them a try.

Any  list of ingredients ????

...and yes I'm with TC I like mine cold with a nice sharp mustard. Horse radish also works.

Edited by Walker570

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2 hours ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Cold with mustard like they should be!

Ditto. . . . . .English Colman's one assumes?

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Just now, mgsontour said:

Ditto. . . . . .English Colman's one assumes?

Is there anything else worth eating?

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1 minute ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Is there anything else worth eating?

No and the status quo must be kept at all costs sir

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1 hour ago, Walker570 said:

Horse radish also works.

Never heard that one before. I shall have to experiment.

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45 minutes ago, mgsontour said:

No and the status quo must be kept at all costs sir

Indeed

8 minutes ago, Mr_Nobody said:

Never heard that one before. I shall have to experiment.

Me too!

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4 hours ago, Jonty said:

Just spent a very enjoyable morning with a retired butcher learning how to make pork pies from scratch, I’m seriously looking forward to trying it once it’s cooled down.

8CE518C0-F0AC-46CA-8A47-CBDF852935AC.jpeg

F45AEEFC-5FE8-4607-A92E-0ECAFF16EC17.jpeg

Recipe and method would be greatly appreciated by us all?

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31 minutes ago, Mr_Nobody said:

Never heard that one before. I shall have to experiment.

Mix it with a raw egg yoke.

/M

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1 minute ago, Mr_Nobody said:

Yes, of Salmonella.

Get a better supplier 

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1 hour ago, Walker570 said:

Working that hot water pastry is fun too.  Looks like you made a very good first attempt.   I haven't made full out pork pies but my game pies are made on the same prinicipal and almost always contain some pork, usuall belly pork to help keep the game meats moist.  You've started something and I am going to have to give them a try.

Any  list of ingredients ????

...and yes I'm with TC I like mine cold with a nice sharp mustard. Horse radish also works.

I’ll have to be careful with this, it’s how his dad made them before passing it on to him.

as they re a ‘northern’ pie rather than a Melton Mowbray, there needs to be some ‘curing’ in the filling  so the meat is pink and a little bit more tangy, this is achieved in this recipe by using 80% lean pork shoulder to 20% bacon, all minced up together.  Seasoning was salt, white pepper and a very small touch of cayenne, all mixed up,with the meat and Set  in the fridge whilst the pastry was made.

with the pastry, the lard was heated up to 80 deg C in a pan the night before and left to cool to room temp, this leaves the lard a lot more soft and easy to work.  The pies we were making were a 4 inch diameter and 2 inch high ring, a ball of 7 to 8 oz of pastry was just right for this, the ball is kneaded and stretched on the work surface until you have what almost looks like a bread cake (bread bun) shape, you then put it into the former as in one of the original pics and shape it at]round the former to make a cup shape to put the meat in and then make a lid  to cap it off.

Glazed with egg and. cooked in the oven at 170 for best part of an hour, on taking it out, you pout gelatin/stock into the pie after making a small hole in the top. 
 

Apologies if. my description is a bit sketchy, I’ll post a sequence of pics of the process if it helps/people are interested.

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Posted (edited)

That is very interesting and totally different to 'my' system which comes from both a Mrs Beeton's book and knowledge from my grandmother some 65yrs ago.  I warm the flour in a large bowl having made a cupped centre, I then put the lard in a saucepan and melt it down until it just starts to boil, then imediately pour this into the 'bowl' of flour and mix with a wooden spatula until firm enough to finally mould into a ball with hands.  I then put 75% of this into a lined springform baking tin and form it up and around the sides and base as thin as I dare with a straight sided whisky glass. Then put the prepared uncooked meat mixture suitable flavoured and salted into this and level it down and then roll out the remaining pastry which i have kept warm under a tea towel and carefully place this on top having brushed beaten egg around the edge to help seal it. I then press the edge all round with an edging tool or a large table fork will do the job and then trim the edges.  I don't put any jelly in my game pies as the meat tends to not shrink. Cook at around 200 until I get a Beef Medium on my temperature gauge and that is it.  Missed out that I put a level dessertspoon of salt in the flour.   I also include about 10% volume of good smoked streaky bacon in the ground game meat and have included dried apricots and apple which works well.

I am defintely going to have a go at a straight pork pie though.

If you let the pastry go anywhere near cold it will crumble and be wasted so speed is of the essence once you have it mixed.

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Edited by Walker570

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Hi walker, my friend explained to me that something is added to lard to make it keep the shape of a block at room temp, if you heat it to 80 deg C and let it cool back to room tem it is much more soft/creamy and therefore more forgiving.  This chap used to make 200 pies at a tie so. I’m assuming that necessary short cuts/work arounds were taken .  We made 8 pies, incredibly slowly (beginner me) and the pastry was very workable even after it had cooled - the preheated lard is apparently the reasoning why.

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Very interesting, you learn something every day, particularly on PW. As said I go back a fair few years and most of what I do cooking wise was learned at my Grannies knee, but your never to old to learn new tricks.  Those pies looked very tasty.

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Drool!

Some excellent culinary skill shown in this thread. Just looked in the emoji captions for food and could not find one for a pie which comes as a surprise  as surely the 'humble pie' must be the most ubiquitous culinary delight.

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13 hours ago, Walker570 said:

That is very interesting and totally different to 'my' system which comes from both a Mrs Beeton's book and knowledge from my grandmother some 65yrs ago.  I warm the flour in a large bowl having made a cupped centre, I then put the lard in a saucepan and melt it down until it just starts to boil, then imediately pour this into the 'bowl' of flour and mix with a wooden spatula until firm enough to finally mould into a ball with hands.  I then put 75% of this into a lined springform baking tin and form it up and around the sides and base as thin as I dare with a straight sided whisky glass. Then put the prepared uncooked meat mixture suitable flavoured and salted into this and level it down and then roll out the remaining pastry which i have kept warm under a tea towel and carefully place this on top having brushed beaten egg around the edge to help seal it. I then press the edge all round with an edging tool or a large table fork will do the job and then trim the edges.  I don't put any jelly in my game pies as the meat tends to not shrink. Cook at around 200 until I get a Beef Medium on my temperature gauge and that is it.  Missed out that I put a level dessertspoon of salt in the flour.   I also include about 10% volume of good smoked streaky bacon in the ground game meat and have included dried apricots and apple which works well.

I am defintely going to have a go at a straight pork pie though.

If you let the pastry go anywhere near cold it will crumble and be wasted so speed is of the essence once you have it mixed.

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I could give that pie a very good coat of looking at!  It looks superb.

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I’ve just resized some photos, hopefully they give an explanation of the process.

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