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Because it looks dry and like it might take dirty finger marks 

4 minutes ago, snow white said:

Because it looks dry and like it might take dirty finger marks 

 

Edited by snow white
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CCL stock gun conditioning oil, done my shotgun stocks with it and they have come up fantastic, one bottle goes a long way, still not finished the first one. every couple of days use just a little dab and rub it in well with the palm of your hand, need to generate some heat with the rubbing, don't expect results straight away its a case of the long game, 

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Well this is my take on it. You have a nice gunstock and could easily ruin it with gummy oil not really designed for the job. I would get myself some London Gunstock finish off that bay. Dont get the whole kit you dont need it and follow the instructions. This of course is only what I would do.

ASSUMING OF COURSE THAT THE STOCK IS OILED AND NOT VARNISHED.

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Others on here who know more about these things will no doubt come along, but - a few thoughts.

A new gun will have the wood 'finished'.  There are various finishes used - of which an oil finish is only one type.

Most modern guns have a factory finish and it is very probably not a traditional oil finish, but some variation on lacquer/varnish/sealant - which will protect the wood adequately and look reasonable.  It will in effect have sealed the wood.  Putting oil on top won't be ideal - as an oil finish is a slow process where oil is gradually worked into the surface layer of fresh wood in many layers over many days/weeks.

Really - a proper oil finish (which is quite a time consuming and laborious job) needs to start with fresh prepared wood - and be built up over time in many layers; there are various old sayings like "once an hour for a day, once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year - and thereafter as needed ......"

It can be done - and the wood needs to be really well prepared (the finish depends on the preparation - you won't get a good finish on badly prepared surfaces).  And then proceed building up in layers - there are various 'guides' on line.

If you just oil, you may end up with a layer of oil on top of a sealed finish - and the oil will just 'sit there'.  Only my view.

Having said all that, a little oil rubbed on by the palm of the hand (literally about 1 drop) - will just seal any scratches/marks in the sealant and help long term protection.

 

Edited by JohnfromUK
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The Stock is oil finished. I'm putting off doing mine simply because before long I'll have the new 22WMR and that will also need doing so two birds with one cloth. I'll be using Renaissance wax polish - a misnomer perhaps as this does not leave things shiney, but with a soft sheen. When you've done the wood, with a smidgen do the metal.

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50 minutes ago, JohnfromUK said:

Others on here who know more about these things will no doubt come along, but - a few thoughts.

A new gun will have the wood 'finished'.  There are various finishes used - of which an oil finish is only one type.

Most modern guns have a factory finish and it is very probably not a traditional oil finish, but some variation on lacquer/varnish/sealant - which will protect the wood adequately and look reasonable.  It will in effect have sealed the wood.  Putting oil on top won't be ideal - as an oil finish is a slow process where oil is gradually worked into the surface layer of fresh wood in many layers over many days/weeks.

Really - a proper oil finish (which is quite a time consuming and laborious job) needs to start with fresh prepared wood - and be built up over time in many layers; there are various old sayings like "once an hour for a day, once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year - and thereafter as needed ......"

It can be done - and the wood needs to be really well prepared (the finish depends on the preparation - you won't get a good finish on badly prepared surfaces).  And then proceed building up in layers - there are various 'guides' on line.

If you just oil, you may end up with a layer of oil on top of a sealed finish - and the oil will just 'sit there'.  Only my view.

Having said all that, a little oil rubbed on by the palm of the hand (literally about 1 drop) - will just seal any scratches/marks in the sealant and help long term protection.

 

Wise words!

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Renaissance wax by the way is not a wood finish. Was not designed as such. It was/is formulated to protect museum artefacts from atmospheric pollution and is safe on any finish That's it's job and it does it well. On the other hand there are finishes designed exclusively for gunstocks!

 

Having said that, Ren wax dont half make your metal work shine.

Edited by DUNKS
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33 minutes ago, DUNKS said:

Renaissance wax by the way is not a wood finish. Was not designed as such. It was/is formulated to protect museum artefacts from atmospheric pollution and is safe on any finish That's it's job and it does it well. On the other hand there are finishes designed exclusively for gunstocks!

 

Having said that, Ren wax dont half make your metal work shine.

Quite right - as is your edit.

The OP's gun is new and has an oil finish so what the OP would be doing is ptotecting that finish. The last thing that you want is a shiney gun for live quarry work so easy does the application on the metal.

Elsewhere on here is a mention about smoothing a Sivers pad. The vaseline followed up by the Renaissance was so greased weasel like that I'll be doing it on th R10 as well.

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1 hour ago, DUNKS said:

Sorry I thought the OP said his stock looked dry, so what he wants is to feed it.

No, Dunks, once again you're perfectly correct. Perhaps I should have said. Mine is right behind me and I can understand the OP's comment. However, the finish has been well applied and rather than going to the trouble of redoing it, protecting it may well be the easier and equally effective option until work becomes necessary. But to answer  the OP's question, on my shotguns I use the proprietory 'Tru- Oil'.

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On 22/01/2021 at 16:48, snow white said:

Thanks lads I have rubbed some boiled linseed in it looks lot better not that dry look will keep doing for about 4 days like I have done with shotguns

Many thanks for your initial post. As I indicated, for me, mine was fine as it was except for applying some polish to protect it. Wrong! With nothing better to do last night I sat down and masked off the checkering ready for the polish. Then I thought there's no way I'm going to use all of this oil so why waste it and so gave the stock a coat. The wood has changed colour to a lovely darker richer brown with a hint of alkanet. I'm going to give it another coat before I use the polish.

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