Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Centrepin

Grandchildren and guns

Recommended Posts

It's nice to see plenty of grandads getting out with the kids and doing things. Memories that last a life time.

I often hear myself saying things my grandad said, "nearly there, just round the next corner", and "grandads have to torment you, its the law"

My work bench always has bits of the last project lingering. This time it was an axe and sickle for sharpening. Usually it's broken toys or fishing tackle. Just out of shot was some plastic cladding I was using to make target stands and a one off pattern plate for the .410.

Let the little one pattern his .410 on scrap cladding then it's an unusual decoration in his bedroom. And a casual reminder that shot penetrates and isn't a toy.

Last weekend he presented me with a pheasant completely cleaned, skinned and with both breasts in place. He'd been allowed to do it himself and wanted me to eat it for tea. He took great pride in telling me how he'd stood on its wings and pulled it. His reward for picking up at a beat (that and a small bottle of non alcoholic beer). A carrier bag of feathers for his Mum for making brouches was her gift for letting him go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, team tractor said:

I’m the same with my boy. His mum leaves him on YouTube for days and I mean days and then becomes dependent on it and won’t switch it off.

ill have on my weekend and start to get some where and boom it’s mums time . 

We get to deal with the tantrums etc. We have a fairly normal life and both work hard. When were not at work we work hard at home. So as a result it can be a bit dull sometimes. But she has 4 different friends within 300yds of home and a pony to look after. But when she's with her dad and his family its best behaviour, on the mobile all the time, either completely ignored or mad over the top attention and out every weekend she's there spending money, eating out or lounging on the sofa "chillaxing".

She's a good kid but they make a fool out of her. So when she decided she wants to take up tetrathalon with the pony club I've said ill buy her a little air pistol to learn with which will hopefully drag her outdoors and into the fresh air. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it is a privilege to teach your grandkids how to handle and respect guns. As some on here know I have taught twin granddaughters to shoot, they started at 15 and have used everything from air rifles through rimfires to 6.5x55. They are both very good shots and responsible, but there is fun to shoot onions off strings at 150 yards! Particularly when you are leaning over a large straw bale and doing if free hand. They are now 18 years old and pretty young girls, but still enjoy coming out with Poppa, for a days practice. One boyfriend who came with us once was gobsmacked when his girlfriend unslipped a rifle and preceded to load it, lean over the straw bale and shot an onion off a string at 150 yards first shot. That was amusing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Fisheruk said:

Yes, it is a privilege to teach your grandkids how to handle and respect guns. As some on here know I have taught twin granddaughters to shoot, they started at 15 and have used everything from air rifles through rimfires to 6.5x55. They are both very good shots and responsible, but there is fun to shoot onions off strings at 150 yards! Particularly when you are leaning over a large straw bale and doing if free hand. They are now 18 years old and pretty young girls, but still enjoy coming out with Poppa, for a days practice. One boyfriend who came with us once was gobsmacked when his girlfriend unslipped a rifle and preceded to load it, lean over the straw bale and shot an onion off a string at 150 yards first shot. That was amusing.

That sounds fun, onion on string, make a nice target for the little one to use the .410 on. Thought process.....orange would be good or any soft fruit that would explode.

It's enough to keep the boyfriend in line. I love it when things like that happen. Granddaughter not old enough for boyfriends yet.

My wife used to be a cracking shot with a rifle up to about 200 yards. Depending on the calibre and weight of rifle, often better than me. She wasn't bad with a .410 either.

Edited by Centrepin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, team tractor said:

I bet your getting excited to test it

Yes, I was tempted to take it out today but resisted.

Been shooting all day, first thing I did when I came in (after taking my boots off) rub down and put another coat of stain on. Waiting for it to dry now.

Trying to have it finished for Sunday for the little monster to use.😁

I'm thinking of trying cold blacking the barrel next week if the woodwork looks right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Centrepin said:

Yes, I was tempted to take it out today but resisted.

Been shooting all day, first thing I did when I came in (after taking my boots off) rub down and put another coat of stain on. Waiting for it to dry now.

Trying to have it finished for Sunday for the little monster to use.😁

I'm thinking of trying cold blacking the barrel next week if the woodwork looks right.

It’s ok but not great stuff. £40 locally to black a barrel but I did my 22lr and it’s ok ish 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, team tractor said:

It’s ok but not great stuff. £40 locally to black a barrel but I did my 22lr and it’s ok ish 

£16 for a tin here, then I have to apply it.

Nearly as much as I paid for the gun🙄

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in the city and I do know what comfry is you can use it as a fertiliser around tomato plants also around your veg patch my old next door neighbors used to swear by it as they had plenty growing in their garden for their vegs I also used it too 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great thread, reminded me of some past events and times. I ran a shooting club for the best part of 15 years with disciplines varying from Police pistol, long range rifle, .22 plinking to PSG and during this time my three daughters were growing up. My eldest showed an interest and eventually used to assist me with the whole thing from admin to range officer. As RO she was extremely alert and tough with the members. Later, I was the shooting officer with an ATC squadron and my two younger daughters joined and became proficient with the No. 8 and L98 rifles. All of them respected firearms and could strip, clean and re-assemble with ease. They now have all moved in different directions but we often recall those happy times and occasionally we get together for a clay shoot where their respective partners are constantly amazed at their proficiency and attitude. My grandson has recently expressed an interest after seeing some pictures of his Mum shooting so we will continue to educate and hope he takes to it as his Mum and Aunts did.

Having remarried a few years ago (in Mongolia) I celebrated a birthday there and was presented with a freshly slaughtered sheep for the birthday feast. Whilst the animal was  being butchered, the guests including children, were given strips of liver wrapped in a little fat,  put on a stick and toasted over the bonfire. I can honestly say that it was the best liver I have tasted. I remarked to some of my new in-laws that in the UK many children would not even perhaps know where meat came from let alone enjoy the meal. They seemed quite perplexed at this and asked if we educate our children in the reality of life. Aside from the language, I found it quite difficult to answer. The sheep was divided, with some being presented to the elderly of the nearby village (gift of the Angli birthday boy) and the rest cooked with vegetables and red hot (washed)stones from the base of the fire in a home made pressure cooker made from a milk churn with a leather seal that was pricked occasionally to release some steam. All this on an open bonfire. It tasted great (a bit tough for western teeth though!) A brilliant day though with great people 

Edited by impala59

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impala59.   You must tell us the whole story sometime.   Very interesting read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Grandalf said:

Impala59.   You must tell us the whole story sometime.   Very interesting read.

Anyone who likes open spaces would love Mongolia. Very welcoming people and every day is an adventure for softie westerners like me. Three times the size of France with the population of South London I would recommend a visit to anyone

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would be a privilege in itself to share with a village.  In this country mutton is a very over looked meat.

Mongolia sounds like the type of place worth visiting before it gets modernised and every one walks round glued to a phone.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Centrepin said:

That would be a privilege in itself to share with a village.  In this country mutton is a very over looked meat.

Mongolia sounds like the type of place worth visiting before it gets modernised and every one walks round glued to a phone.

 

One outstanding image I have is seeing a elderly man in sky blue traditional dress, mounted on his tall wooden saddle atop his small, tough Mongolian horse, We were travelling across country (no road) and had stopped for a picnic lunch. This chap sat on his horse about 50yards away and I asked my brother - in - law what he wanted. I was told that we could invite the chap to join us which we did with a wave (as he would not approach without invitation) as we waved him over he was silhouetted against the clear blue sky on a ridge of the steppes and he swung out an old Motorola flip and phoned home! The people in the countryside take what they want of the modern world and continue in their traditional lifestyle. Unfortunately, the draw of university is removing the younger generation from the country to the city to seek a better/easier life. I do hope some traditions remain and do not get disneyfied

As for the old man on the horse he was an octogenarian out looking for some wayward goats and was quite amazed to find an Englishman in his domain and promptly invited us all to his ger (yurt) for a meal. Sums up the people really

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I took my 6 year old grandson shooting with his own gun.

I didn't really get time to finish it in time, it needs another rub down and more varnish, but i said I'd take him so 0800 this morning saw me greasing, oiling and reassembling.

I asked the ground owner if I could set up some static targets and he agreed.👍

I hadn't bargained on the crowds today with the sun out. 10 deep on some stands. I shot my turn with the little man button pressing then noticed about a dozen or more waiting. Polite thing was to ask and no one voiced any objection. I set up two plastic bottles of water at two different ranges and let him load. Kneeling behind with my arms around him ready him I told him in his own time.

Bang, one bottle, one shot, totally demolished. What I wasnt expecting was the cheer from behind. Thanks guys, I swear he grew a foot taller.

Unfortunately he missed the next and I'd said he was only having two at each stand, but the crowd said let him shoot till he burst it.  Two more shots and another bottle dead.

More cheers and lots of well dones for him. No one seemed to mind the delay and he was really proud of himself.

Bottles or what was left of them in the bin and we moved on.

Later I let him kill some cartridge boxes and he managed 14 shots today, at least 10 hits😉 and he's happy with his new gun and life in general. 

Plenty of people kept telling him he was a better shot than his grandad and of course I don't despute it for a second. 

His Mum has him back now, after he stripped and cleaned it. Time for my nap then sandpaper and varnish again. 🙄

One happy little man and his grandad.  Before anyone pulls me over the picture, he wears a flat cap to shoot, we where walking off to the car when someone offered to take the picture. 

 

 

20200119_155740.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fabulous and just the traditions we need to continue, all power to you and the youngster, I am sure he will remember this day always

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, impala59 said:

 

As for the old man on the horse he was an octogenarian out looking for some wayward goats and was quite amazed to find an Englishman in his domain and promptly invited us all to his ger (yurt) for a meal. Sums up the people really

That's what it used to be like here years ago. I remember total strangers offering cold drinks on hot days or shelter from rain when I was out with my grandad (seemingly 100 of miles from home).

What went wrong, you blink a lifetime has passed, and people rarely even say good morning any more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

probably material for a new thread, I am sure that many recall better days past, for now it looks like your grandson is getting a great start in life, he's a lucky boy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember the first time I used a 12g on holiday . We were on the back of a cruise ship and I shot 25 for 30 shots . ( not that good now) I turned around and the crowds all clapped and cheered. My happy memory and that’s 25+ years ago so looking at that picture it’s making me smile inside. That’s a hell of a memory and you should be proud 😎😎😎😎😎👍👍👍👍👍.  
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a happy smiling day and lots of people spoke to him offering encouragement, I think plenty of Dads and Grandads out there today wondering if their little ones would fancy a pop. Plenty of Mums too.

Even if I did hold anyone up at least they had the good grace not to complain that we could hear.

According to my daughter, he's been talking about it all day since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Centrepin said:

It was a happy smiling day and lots of people spoke to him offering encouragement, I think plenty of Dads and Grandads out there today wondering if their little ones would fancy a pop. Plenty of Mums too.

Even if I did hold anyone up at least they had the good grace not to complain that we could hear.

According to my daughter, he's been talking about it all day since.

Excellent 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Centrepin said:

Today I took my 6 year old grandson shooting with his own gun.

I didn't really get time to finish it in time, it needs another rub down and more varnish, but i said I'd take him so 0800 this morning saw me greasing, oiling and reassembling.

I asked the ground owner if I could set up some static targets and he agreed.👍

I hadn't bargained on the crowds today with the sun out. 10 deep on some stands. I shot my turn with the little man button pressing then noticed about a dozen or more waiting. Polite thing was to ask and no one voiced any objection. I set up two plastic bottles of water at two different ranges and let him load. Kneeling behind with my arms around him ready him I told him in his own time.

Bang, one bottle, one shot, totally demolished. What I wasnt expecting was the cheer from behind. Thanks guys, I swear he grew a foot taller.

Unfortunately he missed the next and I'd said he was only having two at each stand, but the crowd said let him shoot till he burst it.  Two more shots and another bottle dead.

More cheers and lots of well dones for him. No one seemed to mind the delay and he was really proud of himself.

Bottles or what was left of them in the bin and we moved on.

Later I let him kill some cartridge boxes and he managed 14 shots today, at least 10 hits😉 and he's happy with his new gun and life in general. 

Plenty of people kept telling him he was a better shot than his grandad and of course I don't despute it for a second. 

His Mum has him back now, after he stripped and cleaned it. Time for my nap then sandpaper and varnish again. 🙄

One happy little man and his grandad.  Before anyone pulls me over the picture, he wears a flat cap to shoot, we where walking off to the car when someone offered to take the picture. 

 

 

20200119_155740.jpg

Absolutely wonderful heart-warming series of posts. Well done Centrepin - you should be massively proud of yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...