Jump to content

Disappointing spuds


Recommended Posts

When I see (and used to pick when a lad) spuds growing in fields the foliage is usually sub 18" tall and upright. every time I try to go grow them in the garden borders or containers the foliage grows so tall and skinny it falls over and the yield results in about the same value of spuds that were planted - as an average when taking into account the ones that are too small to bother with, though I still pick them for the bin.

After giving up trying in borders around the lawn in well dug and earthed up soil then finding them full of holes I took to using grow bag method with fresh compost and store bought farmyard manure mixed maybe 50/50. To call it a loss would be an understatement when counting the cost of the growing medium.

 

Anyone else finding its just not worth doing apart from the occupational therapy during shielding - and any thoughts about this will be appreciated, the bags I used this year are dog feed bags with drainage holes spiked into them. 

 

I'm suspecting the fact they don't get all day sun might be the issue, being grown around the lawn next to 6' fencing - could that be why the plant produces excess top growth rather than spuds?

Edited by Dave-G
Store bought farmyard manure
Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a few farms around here that grow spuds, after harvesting there’s usually tons left on the top that don't get picked, most of the farmers are happy with me filling a couple of bags with these spuds free of charge, saves all the hassle of growing my own. :yes:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Must be a Leicester and Leicestershire thing as here in Kirby Muxloe mine also haven't amounted to much at all. Maybe not even four pounds of potatoes yield from nine plants. I put this down to using left over supermarket potatoes that had chitted rather than buying true seed potatoes. 

Edited by enfieldspares
Link to post
Share on other sites

They took up so much room in my veg plot that I gave up growing them 30yrs ago. I have seen where you try and grow your Dave and they really are going to be drawn up and produce lots of greenery. For the price of a bag of good tatters the effort is just not worth it.  All down to how big a household you have I suppose but just for two of us I can concentrate on better veg which I can freeze....... broadbeans, french beans and a fresh succesion of carrots and swiss chard with leeks all winter.  Courgettes I grow in tubs for spring and summer eating.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Walker570 said:

They took up so much room in my veg plot that I gave up growing them 30yrs ago. I have seen where you try and grow your Dave and they really are going to be drawn up and produce lots of greenery. For the price of a bag of good tatters the effort is just not worth it.  All down to how big a household you have I suppose but just for two of us I can concentrate on better veg which I can freeze....... broadbeans, french beans and a fresh succesion of carrots and swiss chard with leeks all winter.  Courgettes I grow in tubs for spring and summer eating.

That confirms my thoughts thanks Nev - smaller veg it is then.  Leeks might get a go next and I'm trying my hand at brussels this year to go with the carrots and onions. Never tried beans as they look like a lot of trouble wi climbing frames being needed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you may be correct with the light idea - my spuds grew so high and fast to reach light that they fell over as soon as a decent wind blew - it really isn't worth growing your own money wise. Now I stick to Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Chillies and herbs - Coriander grows well and gives the garden a nice smell.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, bruno22rf said:

I think you may be correct with the light idea - my spuds grew so high and fast to reach light that they fell over as soon as a decent wind blew - it really isn't worth growing your own money wise. Now I stick to Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Chillies and herbs - Coriander grows well and gives the garden a nice smell.

Yup - I've reached the conclusion that's better left to people with large gardens and a wide open vegetable patch. I've recently put some grape vines against one of the fences. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dave-G said:

That confirms my thoughts thanks Nev - smaller veg it is then.  Leeks might get a go next and I'm trying my hand at brussels this year to go with the carrots and onions. Never tried beans as they look like a lot of trouble wi climbing frames being needed.

Standard french beans do not need support, grow very quickly as bushy plants in early summer and produce tons of pods which can be topped and tailed and frozen. I vaccuum pak mine so they take up very litle room in the freezer. I have some which I sowed about 3 weeks ago  as a trial to see if they will flower and produce into November if we do not get any frost.  Leeks are a doddle, don't bother with this papering up etc etc. I dip mine in fairly deep and pour the water into the hole, they produce about two inches of white and 4 or 5 of tender green leaf.  Great with some cheese sauce poured over.  I pick them early when about an inch thick and don't try and grow championship size leeks which are almost inedible.  You don't have the space for broad beans.

If you like garlic then that is so easy to grow but you need to be patient. The bulbs need to go in about now but will not mature until Julyish next year.

Take up very little room, 4 inches apart will do it.

I lather my garden with farmyard manure every winter...the steralised bagged stuff and top dress with Growmore in the spring.

Edited by Walker570
Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

 don't bother with this papering up etc etc. I dip mine in fairly deep and pour the water into the hole,

Lol, I'll do some google to see what thats all about. :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I grow my own spuds as they're much better than the shops. This year they did surprisingly well down here in Devon despite the locals saying you can't grow King Edwards round these parts.

I like to get them in early even if it means fleecing the tops to protect from frost as we tend to get a dry late spring that stops them growing well. I also gave them plenty of room, planted fairly deep, earthed them up and watered when it was very dry.

The only downside was a fairly early onset of blight due to the wet summer. Cutting the tops off seemed to protect the crop well enough.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...