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Good evening gang, hope all is well.

I am currently thinking of offering my Labrador for stud. Something I have never done before.

So I wondered if anyone can offer advice on how to start the ball rolling, (where to offer him) and any other useful info I should know.

We are not talking a field trial champion but he is kc registered and has good pedigree. He has made a fairly steady reasonable gundog so far and is 5 years old.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

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My first question would be has he had all the health tests, hips elbows eyes etc.?If not frankly I wouldn’t bother. I think I have some pretty good dogs but just don’t think about it. There are so many better dogs out there with all the health tests, FT awards and the like I have never thought it worth investing the money in the tests was worthwhile. So I don’t even think about it. Why would you choose my good working dog over a FTW or FTCh.

I also don’t believe in breeding for the sake of it. It should be a properly researched and calculated activity for the good of the breed.

Obviously your decision, just my thoughts.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for the reply Dave at Kelton.

I hadn't thought about hip/eye tests etc. I do have some paperwork relating to hip scores on his parents but will have a read through and check it out.

My main reason for considering him for stud, is I would possibly like a pup from him & castration may becoming a possibility.

Edited by aga man
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16 minutes ago, aga man said:

Thanks for the reply Dave at Kelton.

I hadn't thought about hip/eye tests etc. I do have some paperwork relating to hip scores on his parents but will have a read through and check it out.

My main reason for considering him for stud, is I would possibly like a pup from him & castration may becoming a possibility.

My dogs are all castrated at between 18-24 months for a multitude of reasons. Sometimes I think wouldn’t it be good to have a dog like. ..... ? In practice it doesn’t work that way and I am spoilt for choice of good working dogs here so let someone else go through the hassle and just buy a pup as I need one.

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5 minutes ago, Dave at kelton said:

My dogs are all castrated at between 18-24 months for a multitude of reasons. Sometimes I think wouldn’t it be good to have a dog like. ..... ? In practice it doesn’t work that way and I am spoilt for choice of good working dogs here so let someone else go through the hassle and just buy a pup as I need one.

Thanks again Dave and point taken.

The reason for asking the questions is to help me gain info and give it all some careful thought.

I appreciate your input👍

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1 minute ago, aga man said:

Thanks again Dave and point taken.

The reason for asking the questions is to help me gain info and give it all some careful thought.

I appreciate your input👍

That’s how we all learn and I am sure others will have different views. Good luck with whatever you decide.

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People often get caught up in the idea (romance) of "carrying on their line". Most would be better off going back to the breed they had their dog off and trying to get one bred similar. 

 

If you do want the health tests then I have found - https://www.petgeneticslab.co.uk/ - to be a popular provider. 

£125 for the main ones and another £125 if you want the lot. Hip scores and elbows will also need to be tested, think its roughly just above £200 for hips and another £100+ on top of that for elbows. Eye tests will also been needed every year I think, I think thats roughly £120 ish. 

 

So your looking at say £500-700 worth of health testing before you properly offer the dog at stud. Then you have to find someone who is willing to use your dog at stud. 

So they may be asking you what your dog has to offer that other stud dogs don't offer. 

 

I got my springer dog health tested recently, as he is from very good lines and has performed well out in the field for me shooting. If he wins an award at trials I would want a pup back from him. If not, I think perhaps I'd be better off buying a pup in off something better. 

He has done very well out shooting alongside some of the top competitors in our part of the country. 

I still haven't had anyone with a really good bitch ask to use him at stud, as good as he is when out, there are others that are even better. I have had a few say they would be interested in using him IF he wins a novice trial / award. I think that's fair enough. 

 

If you really want to put effort into trying to breed a really good dog, then ideally you want to marry up your dogs pedigree with a bitch of similar lines to try and breed back the excellent dogs in there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 hours ago, Dave at kelton said:

My dogs are all castrated at between 18-24 months for a multitude of reasons. Sometimes I think wouldn’t it be good to have a dog like. ..... ? In practice it doesn’t work that way and I am spoilt for choice of good working dogs here so let someone else go through the hassle and just buy a pup as I need one.

 

Agree with everything you have said Dave,

 

Out of curiosity, why do you get yours castrated at 18-24 months? What benefit/difference do you think it makes? 

 

thanks 

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8 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:

People often get caught up in the idea (romance) of "carrying on their line". Most would be better off going back to the breed they had their dog off and trying to get one bred similar. 

 

If you do want the health tests then I have found - https://www.petgeneticslab.co.uk/ - to be a popular provider. 

£125 for the main ones and another £125 if you want the lot. Hip scores and elbows will also need to be tested, think its roughly just above £200 for hips and another £100+ on top of that for elbows. Eye tests will also been needed every year I think, I think thats roughly £120 ish. 

 

So your looking at say £500-700 worth of health testing before you properly offer the dog at stud. Then you have to find someone who is willing to use your dog at stud. 

So they may be asking you what your dog has to offer that other stud dogs don't offer. 

 

I got my springer dog health tested recently, as he is from very good lines and has performed well out in the field for me shooting. If he wins an award at trials I would want a pup back from him. If not, I think perhaps I'd be better off buying a pup in off something better. 

He has done very well out shooting alongside some of the top competitors in our part of the country. 

I still haven't had anyone with a really good bitch ask to use him at stud, as good as he is when out, there are others that are even better. I have had a few say they would be interested in using him IF he wins a novice trial / award. I think that's fair enough. 

 

If you really want to put effort into trying to breed a really good dog, then ideally you want to marry up your dogs pedigree with a bitch of similar lines to try and breed back the excellent dogs in there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agree with everything you have said Dave,

 

Out of curiosity, why do you get yours castrated at 18-24 months? What benefit/difference do you think it makes? 

 

thanks 

Lloyd, thanks for your endorsement.

as to castration there are several reasons. Firstly I pickup three days a week on one of the UKs top shoots. We share estate vehicles so my dogs can be in the back with several others. I am not worrying about them trying to screw the bitches and they have never got into a fight with the dogs.

secondly, I have been doing this for fifteen years or so and I have found it just takes the silly edge off the dog, reduces sniffing and marking although does not totally remove these. I have seen no effect on my dogs drive or working abilities.

Lastly I understand it can reduce the risk of certain cancers. It may be coincidence but I have never had a dog die of a cancer.

I know a lot of people don’t agree with me and for a lot of my career working dogs I disagreed too but am now convinced it is a good thing in my circumstances. As I have said I don’t breed from my dogs so it simply isn’t an issue.

Cheers 
Dave

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Hi lads don’t want to pinch thread I have a lovely springer she is 7 years old do you think she is to old for first litter our vet said she is to old what do you think I would like to keep the bloody line going as her mother was a wonderful dog so sadly missed

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47 minutes ago, snow white said:

Hi lads don’t want to pinch thread I have a lovely springer she is 7 years old do you think she is to old for first litter our vet said she is to old what do you think I would like to keep the bloody line going as her mother was a wonderful dog so sadly missed

Take the vets advice 👍

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58 minutes ago, snow white said:

Hi lads don’t want to pinch thread I have a lovely springer she is 7 years old do you think she is to old for first litter our vet said she is to old what do you think I would like to keep the bloody line going as her mother was a wonderful dog so sadly missed

 

Yes, too old. Take the vets advice.

As I said above, don’t get caught up in the romance of “keeping the line going”, most people would be better off buying a well bred pup in. 

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Agaman, 

Working dog owners will not want to know unless it is proven in the field or in tests or trials. Pet dog owners are now getting more interested in hips and eye scores etc.

My suggestion is to put yourself out to stud first to see how that feels.

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45 minutes ago, JDog said:

Agaman, 

Working dog owners will not want to know unless it is proven in the field or in tests or trials. Pet dog owners are now getting more interested in hips and eye scores etc.

My suggestion is to put yourself out to stud first to see how that feels.

Hahaha, not so many years ago, I was put to stud regularly with no complaints. My hip scores are no good these days and there is no doubt far better out there.

As for the dog, I was thinking more along the pet dog owners but it seems it is becoming a minefield. No wonder pups of all breeds are fetching so much money these days!

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9 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:

 

Yes, too old. Take the vets advice.

As I said above, don’t get caught up in the romance of “keeping the line going”, most people would be better off buying a well bred pup in. 

+1

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I would have thought somebody on here would have been involved in this to give you a decent answer?

Anyway, I seem to recall reading that is best or was it necessary(?) to start them young. Two years old  springs to mind so I'd look that up to see if it's a consideration. I believe you'd then need to consider the experience of the bitch, at least one of them needs to know what they're doing.

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6 hours ago, yod dropper said:

I would have thought somebody on here would have been involved in this to give you a decent answer?

Anyway, I seem to recall reading that is best or was it necessary(?) to start them young. Two years old  springs to mind so I'd look that up to see if it's a consideration. I believe you'd then need to consider the experience of the bitch, at least one of them needs to know what they're doing.

 

What don't you consider a decent answer? 

Currently what we are working with is an un health tested, 5 year old dog, with no titles or awards. Not sure what lines/pedigree is like. 

When trying to get stud appointments, he is up against dogs with full hip and elbow scores, eye tests and DNA tests, who have achieved titles or status of FTCH.

 

You can go to one of these top FTCH stud dogs for about £800/900. 

You then have absolutely loads of dogs that are OFTW/FTWing dogs, as the next step down.

Then you have every Tom, **** and Harry offering their 'just a shooting dog' at stud, most of which have ALL the full panels of health tests, eye scores and hip and elbow scores. 

 

I would have thought that if the OP wants to go ahead with the idea of offering his dog at stud, then the posts in this thread highlight that he would be better off getting all the health tests done first, and then seeing if he can find someone who wants to use his dog. As I mention, just go on any of the stud dog website, you will see A LOT of people offering their dog for stud. You then have to somehow make your dog stand out above all of them... 

If he attends local shoots then he will have a chance of offering his dog to the people on the shoot, many of whom will of had the opportunity to see the dog work, and that may make them choose his dog over one they've only seen advertised online. 

 

 

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