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Greener GP 12 Gauge Questions


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Just picked up my first Greener GP and was hoping to get some answers to some questions I've had looking at it right out of the box. It's a 1975 case hardened GP 12 gauge 2 3/4" built by Webley & Scott.

 

Questions:

  1. When screwing in the barrel, I'm not able to fully screw in the barrel for the stopper to latch, the wood seems to press against the receiver sooner than the metal piece hits the stopper slot so the barrel is very slightly crooked but the extractors still fit loosely in the openings, is this normal/safe to shoot?
  2. The stock has a little bit of twist movement with some force applied and I'm worried that can cause damage to the stock under recoil, is there a way to tighten the stock to the receiver?
  3. Using snap caps the shell is only ejecting when the lever is fully pushed down and it launches the shell out, rather than partially withdrawing with a softer shorter pull of the lever, is this normal and is there a way to fix this?

Thanks I appreciate any help! Very excited to shoot this but wanted to consult the experts first to protect it.

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I had one,a 1970 model,and remember I had too pull the lever all the way when screwing on the barrel.Not sure about the loose stock,but maybe a bolt under the butt plate.The empties only eject when the lever is flicked all the way.

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3 hours ago, Classified said:

Just picked up my first Greener GP and was hoping to get some answers to some questions I've had looking at it right out of the box. It's a 1975 case hardened GP 12 gauge 2 3/4" built by Webley & Scott.

 

Questions:

  1. When screwing in the barrel, I'm not able to fully screw in the barrel for the stopper to latch, the wood seems to press against the receiver sooner than the metal piece hits the stopper slot so the barrel is very slightly crooked but the extractors still fit loosely in the openings, is this normal/safe to shoot?
  2. The stock has a little bit of twist movement with some force applied and I'm worried that can cause damage to the stock under recoil, is there a way to tighten the stock to the receiver?
  3. Using snap caps the shell is only ejecting when the lever is fully pushed down and it launches the shell out, rather than partially withdrawing with a softer shorter pull of the lever, is this normal and is there a way to fix this?

Thanks I appreciate any help! Very excited to shoot this but wanted to consult the experts first to protect it.

What are you going to use it for?  I like them from a historical point of view but have no use for a single shot gun.

Edited by Weihrauch17
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As I understand it, the GP is not recommended for forceful ejection although the full and sharp rotation downward will eject successfully. When screwing the barrel into the receiver you must hold the lever  fully downward. The stock should be tight on the receiver, using the above manual, check all screws etc. the forend should not foul the receiver when screwing the barrel in. 
Greener do not recommend taking the gun down, except for repairs, all cleaning etc can be achieved with the gun not stripped down.
It sounds like sometime in your guns history it has been taken apart and perhaps not reassembled correctly. I hope you get it sorted, they are great guns!

my GP slug gun

0E634587-14D2-4E62-9DB7-8FF6632E67BD.jpeg.1746e6c1af20382cc09db915e70370bb.jpeg

 

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12 hours ago, Classified said:

Bird hunting and trap, there's definitely much more practical guns out there for both but the martini action makes it just a fun unique gun

Lots of information given above by PH5172 which should enlighten you.
 

Welcome to pigeon watch by the way.

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First off its not an ejector its an extractor gun . Yes if you open the action with enough force then it may throw the case clear .

If its been boxed up since new then the wood could have " moved "as in  swollen or shrunk .If it needs easing off then its not a big job as with the stock which probobly needs the stock bolt pulling up .

Using it without these things correcting could lead to future problems .

 

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Hold it tight when you do eventually shoot it. They kick and the safety latch can hurt.

They do have a significant place in shooting history but I can only think of the Cooey that was a worse gun I ever owned.

No offense intended to owners and I hope you enjoy yours.

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13 hours ago, impala59 said:

As I understand it, the GP is not recommended for forceful ejection although the full and sharp rotation downward will eject successfully. When screwing the barrel into the receiver you must hold the lever  fully downward. The stock should be tight on the receiver, using the above manual, check all screws etc. the forend should not foul the receiver when screwing the barrel in. 
Greener do not recommend taking the gun down, except for repairs, all cleaning etc can be achieved with the gun not stripped down.
It sounds like sometime in your guns history it has been taken apart and perhaps not reassembled correctly. I hope you get it sorted, they are great guns!

my GP slug gun

0E634587-14D2-4E62-9DB7-8FF6632E67BD.jpeg.1746e6c1af20382cc09db915e70370bb.jpeg

 

Did you have to have the choke removed before using slugs? My GP had 30+thou of choke and I imagine that’s a bit much,and would upset the accuracy of rifled slugs?

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49 minutes ago, 39TDS said:

They do have a significant place in shooting history but I can only think of the Cooey that was a worse gun I ever owned.

Gough Thomas actually rated them quite highly for the fact that the gun was well balanced and its "half weight" nicely between the shooter's two hands.

I have had a few GP over the past and as a single barrel pigeon hide gun they are an excellent choice. Much better and safer than any break barrel gun. In fact I'd rate them as the safest choice for a hide gun if taking a novice out for the first time. Instantly checkable as loaded or not with a mere half opening of the action but without the need to "break" the gun as with a break open shotgun.

The gun never needs to be "broken" to reload so is always muzzle up and the gun can be kept loaded but with the action open halfway so that the cartridge is held in the breech until the shooter sees a possible shootable bird. He then as he brings the gun up closes the breech and as the bird comes closer and into range then pushes the safety off and takes the shot. If he changes his mind he opens the lever again to leave the action halfway open.

And back in the past for many the only affordable choice was no gun or a single barrel gun. As single barrel guns go there are worse options and worse options indeed than the GP or the Cooey or, the Aya Cosmos all good. Webley less so but in my opinion the worst was the Argyll and/or the BSA Snipe or BSA XII.

Edited by enfieldspares
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10 hours ago, TOPGUN749 said:

Did you have to have the choke removed before using slugs? My GP had 30+thou of choke and I imagine that’s a bit much,and would upset the accuracy of rifled slugs?

Yes, The barrel shortened to 24" took out all the choke for a true cylinder bore. Shooting offhand, this little gun is actually very accurate with slugs. I have heard from many shooting friends that they are also very accurate on game, with excellent shot patterns when choked (and long!) With reduced length and weight, in my opinion, it is one of the nicest handling shotguns that I own, hold it properly and even the recoil is not awful!

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Mine was a 26” barrel,bought it in an auction in 1998 for £38.Sold for £80 a few years ago.Didn’t use it much,but being light it did recoil and flip a bit. Solid steel guns from a time of quality manufacturing.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Appeal for information!!

My GP suffered a few light strikes over the weekend, so I have dived in and taken it down to component level to try and sort the problem. I am concerned that maybe the pin section of the striker is possibly  a little worn. It mics at 7.79 mm measured from the flat disc to the tip. If anyone has a good striker and could measure I would be much obliged! 
additionally, the whole mechanism was full of grit, unburnt powder, dirt, carbon and other unpleasant gritty stuff (which in itself may be the cause of a slowish strike) When the striker is in the bolt and is fully exposed, the pin protrudes 1.14 mm (possibly easier to measure) Any advice, measurements would be very much appreciated.

I can see why it is not advised to take these guns apart, but with the amount of crud in mine, maybe a full service every few years would be advisable!

In pieces! What have I done?!

4C4B9EE6-49C6-4ABB-889D-3AEA73A9A680.jpeg.a28e038fb11651bf77e1badb9093d342.jpeg
The striker, showing the pin measurement 

2852A541-082E-4376-9147-07F3F2E2BDF7.jpeg.38e42dd9b5060df64ee932ce9303a360.jpeg

 

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pin looks fine...if it was badly worn the smooth regular dome shape would look very different...think the light strikes would be down to fouling and or week spring...can you shim the spring ?

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1 hour ago, ditchman said:

pin looks fine...if it was badly worn the smooth regular dome shape would look very different...think the light strikes would be down to fouling and or week spring...can you shim the spring ?

I think, to be honest it was the fouling, the main spring is fine, so much tension when putting it back together!  As always with these things we tinker with, 20 minutes to carefully it take apart and 3 and 1/2 hours to get it back together, I sort of understand the Greener advice not to take apart! 
However removing a whole pile of various gritty substances has left it smooth and slick in operation, the disc at the base of the pin was grinding on the shaft walls it moves in, now polished with a light oiling it moves freely and without resistance. Back on the range will hopefully confirm!

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5 minutes ago, impala59 said:

I think, to be honest it was the fouling, the main spring is fine, so much tension when putting it back together!  As always with these things we tinker with, 20 minutes to carefully it take apart and 3 and 1/2 hours to get it back together, I sort of understand the Greener advice not to take apart! 
However removing a whole pile of various gritty substances has left it smooth and slick in operation, the disc at the base of the pin was grinding on the shaft walls it moves in, now polished with a light oiling it moves freely and without resistance. Back on the range will hopefully confirm!

would it be an idea on areas that need lube that are hard to get to...maybe either

  1. not to oil it
  2. use graphite powder

what do you rekon ?.............maybe a more qualified person could answer this ?

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I have only lightly oiled the polished areas where obvious metal to metal contact is needed for function. I am over the fear of stripping it now and found that using pin punches as temporary pivots and part locators works well for reassembly.

What I am now, is in awe of the gunsmiths and engineers who developed these old guns, I love levers, cams, pivots etc but all these working parts within a machined box is quite frankly amazing. I would love to see a cutaway Greener cycling the bolt, extract/eject, auto safety and cocking mechanism, with one short lever action and only one spring! Wonderful engineering!

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My Greener stopped working, turned out to be due to the firing pin having snapped. Gunsmith drilled a hole tapped it and threaded a new pin he had made into it.

I was quite shocked at the time he could actually do that at all never mind for a viable price, it worked too. Can't say I ever really enjoyed the gun and don't see the appeal but each to their own.

Sold mine to someone who wanted to pretend it was a rifle and reenact being a soldier in Rourke's Drift.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 04/03/2024 at 16:40, Classified said:

Just picked up my first Greener GP and was hoping to get some answers to some questions I've had looking at it right out of the box. It's a 1975 case hardened GP 12 gauge 2 3/4" built by Webley & Scott.

 

Questions:

  1. When screwing in the barrel, I'm not able to fully screw in the barrel for the stopper to latch, the wood seems to press against the receiver sooner than the metal piece hits the stopper slot so the barrel is very slightly crooked but the extractors still fit loosely in the openings, is this normal/safe to shoot?
  2. The stock has a little bit of twist movement with some force applied and I'm worried that can cause damage to the stock under recoil, is there a way to tighten the stock to the receiver?
  3. Using snap caps the shell is only ejecting when the lever is fully pushed down and it launches the shell out, rather than partially withdrawing with a softer shorter pull of the lever, is this normal and is there a way to fix this?

Thanks I appreciate any help! Very excited to shoot this but wanted to consult the experts first to protect it.

There is a stockbolt accessable from under the buttplate. I seem to remember you might have to open the action fully to engage the barrel correctly when assembling.

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My late Dad got me one of these for my 16th birthday, great little gun. As Gough Thomas said they are exceedingly well balanced. Mine came from Elderkins wearing a full choke barrel, everything it hit was smashed to jelly. The barrel went back a few weeks later & the choke taken out to imp cylinder. It was transformed & threw lovely patterns. For snap shooting bunnies or pigeons it excelled. I used to take it out on the marsh wildfowling though i must confess eley maximums did tend to make it kick a bit! When my parents moved up north he took it with him & i got it back ten years ago when he passed away. I never found the lack of a second shot a handicap as they can be reloaded very quickly.

What you will find is every bloody time you take it out in company some wag will say "The Zulus are coming!"

The worst single barrel was the pedretti folder, dreadful lightweight things that kicked like an elephant gun.

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