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Wb123

Taking in a untrained dog

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It looks like the other half may insist we take in her aunts dog as she is too ill to look after her. 

This dog is a seven year old standard poodle who effectively has never had any meaningful training. It has no concept of walking on a lead, not jumping around like a lunatic, barks constantly, and is barely even toilet trained.

Is the situation likely to be rescueable or should I be resisting taking it in at all costs?

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Bit like taking in a rescue dog. Not the dogs fault.

Takes lots of time and patience, treats, love and hard work.

Some dogs respond better than others.

Doesn't always work out, but at least you tried. 

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keep in mind the standard poodle is an exceptional french working dog....and if clipped out in a working cut ...is a very very good looking dog....

but......it all depends what the brain is like.....if it is trained or used a hunting dog ....the DNA memory might kick in...

you never know ........expect nothing and you might be surprised

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1 hour ago, Centrepin said:

Bit like taking in a rescue dog. Not the dogs fault.

Takes lots of time and patience, treats, love and hard work.

Some dogs respond better than others.

Doesn't always work out, but at least you tried. 

 

It might not be the dogs fault (mostly always isn't) but it also doesn't have to be the OP's problem. 

I think a lot of it will depends on the individual dog and what standard you want from it, and just how ingrained some of those behaviours are. Poodle's were traditionally working dogs, however this dog at 7 is likely well approaching old age, and likely set in his ways. 

Just want  a dog you can take for a walk etc, or even train to sit and behave now and then you may be fine. 

 

 

 

Whilst Ditchman and Centrepin are being positive, I think it's easy to say try it and if it doesn't work out it doesn't matter. However, if the dog becomes a bloody nuisance or problem dog, then it might matter, and rather than just not working out, you might really regret it, and by that point your Mrs has a cute name for it, a big box of treats that he simply has to have, and he won't be going anywhere :/ 

If it was me, I would be very clear with the Mrs that if you take it on a trial, if it is a problem dog, you reserve the option to rehome or something? 

 

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I would suggest take it for a walk on a lead and see if you can correct pulling temporarily  in ten or fifteen minutes then redo exercise  half hour later if correction becomes easier the dog is willing to learn you have a chance        move forward or not       heart strings  have no place in disrupting your family life home life or upsetting neighbours 

if it comes to your home from the first minute  does and don't to all the family must help with boundaries'  and be strict and consistent  if you don't like behaviour  scold it in a deep voice / growling      if you do praise it in a higher excited voice  and some more        (deep voice bad high voice good) 

no such thing as untrainable     if you are consistent / strict  the dog will become calm as you are dominant  and will relax and look to you  for guidance     hard work at the start undoing bad habits start as you mean to go on   if you persist it will work out  its a battle of wills  (who will win)

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We have took in a 7 year old papillon and retrained him into a lovely companion. Also a 3 year old springer from a rescue and he has made a nice rough shooting dog. Not perfect, but good in the house and fine on the lead now. It takes time and a lot of hard work, but if all the family are consistant it is doable. They are an intelligent dog.

If you have a well trained dog already, they often learn by example. That is why rescues that specialise in ex breeders prefer homes with an existing dog for them to learn from.

A belly band is a good option till you get the house training sorted if its male, I believe you can get pants for female dogs. They soon learn if they wee with one on they don't get the satisfaction of scent marking. That is one problem we had with the papillon that the belly band sorted. Once they get used to the idea the belly band comes off for trips outside and walks the house training soon follows. We didn't  get many wet pads before he sussed out what we wanted. Citronella collars help with damping down unwanted barking.

A lot depends with your own situation too. It's easier if someone is home allday especially for the first few weeks. Also if you have very young children, as a dog that jumps up all the time can be a hazard till it's under control.

 

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We looked after it for a weekend a few years back and it drove me to distraction. At the time the aunt had two, the current one and a male who was a couple of years younger and even worse. 

 

After two days of very firm handling the male had demonstrated potential but the female that is now potentially needing rehoming had shown no change. Potentially as the other half was handling the female and didn’t have the strength to correct her as clearly as I had to with the male. 

 

It won’t be possible to get complete consistency if we take it in as occasionally we both work away and will need it either to go to a dog sitter or friends/family.

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13 hours ago, Wb123 said:

We looked after it for a weekend a few years back and it drove me to distraction. At the time the aunt had two, the current one and a male who was a couple of years younger and even worse. 

 

After two days of very firm handling the male had demonstrated potential but the female that is now potentially needing rehoming had shown no change. Potentially as the other half was handling the female and didn’t have the strength to correct her as clearly as I had to with the male. 

 

It won’t be possible to get complete consistency if we take it in as occasionally we both work away and will need it either to go to a dog sitter or friends/family.


Personally I wouldn’t bother if that’s the case. 

As said, it’s not the dogs fault, but it’s also not your problem. 

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If those are your circumstances then forget it. Great pity but not your problem.  See such every day taling their owners for a walk.

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Nothing to lose by giving it a try, you both could learn something from each other.

we took in a patterdale terrier that was 18 months old 2&1/2 years ago very different to the labs ive had

still training him now very head strong, didn’t really know I had that many patients or dedication to be honest 

he has learned to trust us and is very protective, from a loveable playful dog to a hulk dog in a milli second of a knock at the door .

thats an issue in its self which is coming on slowly to be cured

i don’t really think he had the best start in life but I do know he’s got a better standard now. with discipline and attention he’s turning out to be one of the best dogs I’ve had

al 

Edited by Surfer

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2 hours ago, Surfer said:

Nothing to lose by giving it a try, you both could learn something from each other.

we took in a patterdale terrier that was 18 months old 2&1/2 years ago very different to the labs ive had

still training him now very head strong, didn’t really know I had that many patients or dedication to be honest 

he has learned to trust us and is very protective, from a loveable playful dog to a hulk dog in a milli second of a knock at the door .

thats an issue in its self which is coming on slowly to be cured

i don’t really think he had the best start in life but I do know he’s got a better standard now. with discipline and attention he’s turning out to be one of the best dogs I’ve had

al 

 

He absolutely does have something to loose. Once he takes it in his Mrs will declare it their beloved pet, and attach sentimental value to her sick aunt. 

If the dog is an absolute nightmare I imagine there will be very significant problems to rehoming it and many arguments to follow. 

 

 

Much as with dog training, some big issues are a lot easier, if you don't get into the situation to begin with ... but just my opinion. Dog could come great you never know. 

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Have to say I'm in the 'give the dog a chance' camp.

My step mother took in an elderly aunts dog.  The behaviour improved almost immediately, which I put down to 1) strong alpha 2) actually getting regular, decent walks/excercise/stimulation.

A decent haircut and being part of a pack, and the dog had a second go at life.  Her remaining four or so years were much happier than the first 6 (The numbers might not be accurate, this was a while ago, but you get the idea).

 

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16 hours ago, Lloyd90 said:

 

He absolutely does have something to loose. Once he takes it in his Mrs will declare it their beloved pet, and attach sentimental value to her sick aunt. 

If the dog is an absolute nightmare I imagine there will be very significant problems to rehoming it and many arguments to follow. 

 

 

Much as with dog training, some big issues are a lot easier, if you don't get into the situation to begin with ... but just my opinion. Dog could come great you never know. 

Set a few ground rules ie trial period, either way it going to have to be re homed for the dogs sake 

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I've never had a dog I couldn't turn around yet. Some dogs can take huge amounts of time and effort and you need to know what your doing, if that's not you, then don't, if you are prepared to put the time in and either know what your doing or are prepared to learn and or pay someone to show you, go for it.

I've always found it rewarding rescuing dogs others aren't prepared to take on.

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So far I have stressed at every mention that she does not have the time and I do not have the inclination to try and undo all her aunts hard work making the dog so difficult. 

 

When that doesn’t shut down the conversation I mention how the dog is her aunts only companion. 

 

If that gets pushed I suggest it be offered to the people who took the male one a few years ago (that dog I would have considered taking in as within a few hours of looking after it one weekend it was showing potential). The suggestion they might not take it I counter with perhaps it should be put to sleep. That has always stopped the conversation so far but once my new lab arrives in a few weeks things may rear up again.

 

I can’t see the other half moving it on if we take it however bad a trial period goes so there is potentially a lot to lose. 

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