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EV's catching fire, seems to be common than is reported


Weihrauch17
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My accountant has had an ev, the Tesla 3 for about a year now. He’s never charged his EV at home (doesn’t have either the home charger or the 13 amp 3 pin lead). He charges at work and the shops in Bluewater.

If you live in the middle of nowhere, an EV is not for you. If you drive a commercial vehicle an EV is not for you. 

If you mainly do commuting miles, live in a town or a city (and want to avoid ulez etc) then you are in 80% of the UK population who should try an EV. If you can business lease it, than ever better / economical.

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1 hour ago, Mungler said:

 

If you live in the middle of nowhere, an EV is not for you. If you drive a commercial vehicle an EV is not for you.

You don’t have to live in the middle of nowhere.

But if you want to get to the middle of nowhere (this is a shooting/countryside forum) then an EV is useless.
For instance, two days ago I drove 140 miles, then about a mile through a wood. I parked the car in the wood (no charging points there!) and went stalking all day before driving back through the wood and home up the motorway. This is a regular occurrence most weeks, never less than fortnightly. I will be doing a similar thing to a different wood on Wednesday.

EV?     As much use as t.i.t.s. to a nun.

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2 minutes ago, Mungler said:

Oh this is hard work.

Let me put it another way - get an EV, don’t get an EV, I couldn’t give a **** 😆😆

Up to now, it seems they are fine for people who don’t want to go anywhere.

I already decided, I’m not having one.

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2 minutes ago, London Best said:

Up to now, it seems they are fine for people who don’t want to go anywhere.

I already decided, I’m not having one.


If I was looking for advice or an insight about a motorbike, I’d ask someone who actually owned and rode one.

I probably wouldn’t take advice off the fella who had a pedal bike and who had never owned or ridden a motorbike. Stands to reason really. There we go.

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Newbie to this said:

When you can fill up an EV in the same time as a petrol/diesel vehicle, then they may be a viable alternative. 

Until then EVs are not the future.

Kia have one out now that has a 45 min charge time and a 7 year unlimited miles warranty on car and battery.

It also does just under 170 mph and 0-60 in 3 seconds being far more interesting stats 😆


Mind you, someone will be along soon enough to point out you can’t plough a field in it, tow a 10 tonne trailer or get 8 people and suitcases in it. 

Edited by Mungler
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14 minutes ago, Mungler said:

Kia have one out now that has a 45 min charge time and a 7 year unlimited miles warranty on car and battery.

It also does just under 170 mph and 0-60 in 3 seconds being far more interesting stats 😆


Mind you, someone will be along soon enough to point out you can’t plough a field in it, tow a 10 tonne trailer or get 8 people and suitcases in it. 

Nothing wrong with EV's but it make me laugh the speeds quoted and associated with the cars. I drove the very first Leaf at Geneva and it was amazingly quick until they toned it down for the public.In reality the vast majority of EV's seen on the motorway struggle to keep up with traffic as presumably they want to keep an eye on the battery range as they drive and adjust speed accordingly.

It's great to see how the designs of EV's are evolving. 

 

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All the EVs that I have seen on the motorway seem to be making good progress. 
 

if I could get one business wise with a charger at the office would I have one…… too right I would. 
 

if I needed a new personal car would I be tempted - very much so. 
 

everyone I speak to with an EV raves about them - some of these have had high end vehicles in the past. 
 

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15 minutes ago, Robden said:

How would I charge my EV at home if I lived in a second floor flat/tower block?

Presumably the same way my accountant has for the last year - as above, he doesn’t have a home charger. 

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EV owners are advised to avoid overcharging by allowing the battery to run down to about 20 percent charge before powering it up to 80 percent.

Similar to other electronic devices, such as laptops, keeping the battery at a constant full charge will limit the ability to hold a charge and reduce its performance over time.

Quote

One mistake that drivers may overlook is not to plug the car in to charge after a long journey.

Whilst driving, the battery will have generated heat, so it should be left to cool down before being charged

Quote

Similarly, fast charging shouldn’t be overused, as a slow charge is much better for the lifespan of the battery.

Whilst it can be very convenient to rapidly charge it if drivers are in a hurry, the process of forcing high power to the battery in a short space of time will contribute to its degradation.

Some more things that effect range and refill time.

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33 minutes ago, Newbie to this said:

Some more things that effect range and refill time.

It’s all computer operated - you just plug it in and let the software do the necessary - there is no thought process involved at all. 

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21 minutes ago, Mungler said:

It’s all computer operated - you just plug it in and let the software do the necessary - there is no thought process involved at all. 

And still it all effects claimed range and charge times. Like I said in a previous post, there is a lot of false claims or at best claims that mislead when it comes to EVs. Zero emissions being the biggest.

Oh and in their currnet form, they are not the future.

Edited by Newbie to this
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43 minutes ago, Newbie to this said:

And still it all effects claimed range and charge times. Like I said in a previous post, there is a lot of false claims or at best claims that mislead when it comes to EVs. Zero emissions being the biggest.

Oh and in their currnet form, they are not the future.


No they’re not for everyone, and we’re only at the beginning of that change. 

If all the major motor manufacturers reckon they will be ceasing production of combustion engined vehicles in the next decade or so, their plans all appear to be electric based. 

Like I said, I’m not here to flog EV cars 😆 I just wish people would try one before forming a view, because like me they will be pleasantly surprised (my last 3 cars were a 640 diesel BMW [1 year] and two SQ5s [3 years a piece] and my current EV is on balance the better car IMHO - I don’t own the car and the keys will go back in 2 years and I’ll get something else which will be electric - I don’t have any skin in the car or the EV game, I am merely setting out my personal positive experience). I also recognise the potential limitations of EV’s and we are lucky enough the wife has a petrol car and to cover all eventualities from power cuts to petrol shortages.
.

Edited by Mungler
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3 hours ago, McSpredder said:

Just like the sub-Post Masters' accounting system?

 

Or just like charging up a battery for a Makita cordless drill. 

Saying that, the last time I charged up my Makita batteries, CID put in my front door and arrested me for a complex accounting fraud I didn’t commit. Damn these batteries and chargers.

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Posted (edited)

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2022/03/08/london-halts-nickel-trading-prices-surge-100000-tonne/

 

Batteries for Electric Vehicles

Two of the most commonly-used types of batteries, Nickel Cobalt Aluminium (NCA) and Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) use 80% and 33% nickel respectively; newer formulations of NMC are also approaching 80% nickel.

How much do EV batteries weigh?
 
 
An electric car battery weighs about 1,000 lbs or 454 kilograms. You can check your car's battery weight by looking at the battery's label or its packaging. Car batteries can be as light as 25 lbs, or as heavy as 1,200 lbs.12 Oct 2021
Edited by Weihrauch17
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