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impala59

Olive wood

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Reading about Yew, I thought I would ask a similar question. I have some beautifully figured olive wood and want to make a stock and forend. The stock will necessarily be two parts glued together, maybe laminated with a thin walnut centre layer/ stripe due to the thickness of wood that I have (2 old olive wood chopping boards) My questions are; 

does this wood glue well?

will it take oil (my usual preference is danish)?

the grain is lovely in the raw, are there any cutting, working, finishing issues or tips?

are there any turning issues? ( I intend to make a corncob forend)

will it take checkering or stippling? (Undecided at present)

 Thanks gents, confident in the PW massive, someone will know!

 

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9 hours ago, John_R said:

I've seen plenty of bowls and other food/kitchen items made with olive wood.

Yep, I have a pestle and mortar in olive wood

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Dosn't take a polyurethane varnish too well, extend the drying time by at least a day before sanding and extra coats,  no idea why perhaps because its quite an oily wood so to speak or am I talking carp.?

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I guess the fact that bowls are made of this wood means it will turn well and can be sanded to a good finish. Good advice about extending the drying time. Any thoughts about glues? If the wood is naturally oily is there a suitable glue type?

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It can be an absolute sod to glue because of the oil, I clean the surfaces with Car Brake cleaner (Acetone and petrol distilates) just before glueing with Epoxy.

It will take oil but not a lot, I was trying to stain with Alkanet oil and couldn't get it as dark as I wanted

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Actually having a nightmare with the stuff at this very moment, sealed it with linseed oil(boiled) wiped off what didn't soak in then gave it a light coat of shellac........talk about nightmare its grinned and is as rough as a badgers ****, 400 grit later and upto 1000 grade and its still putting up a fight, 

If it wasn't for the storming grain patterns I would swerve using olive wood all day long

Persevere with the stuff as you can make it look like its been dipped in very shiny plastic........................if your lucky enough.

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I cut a couple of corners off to try glue, (epoxy) we will see how it bonds. A couple of pictures to show what I’ve got to work with. Could be stunning methinks🤪

 

97BB51C2-6F27-4F27-8352-1FA4993F0866.jpeg

 

 

233528B4-50E2-42C3-B101-FB26197BD1F1.jpeg

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2 hours ago, pond digger 007 said:

Just check it doesn’t react with steel !  I’ve this nagging feeling that I read somewhere that it did, but equally, I might have dreamt it.

Just found a good site,

wood-database.com

 Seems fairly positive about olive wood but questions it’s stability. The test bits I glued seem to have bonded well , I prepared the surfaces with acetone and used araldite epoxy. So another project added to the list. Will report in due course

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Well I blew that idea! I guess I found out what the write-ups said about this wood being unstable, my plan was to make in two halves then laminate together (due to 20mm thickness of available wood) Both pieces split along grain lines while cutting with a fine tooth band saw! All in the bin now and Mrs asking where the nice new chopping boards are...….

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Oh, that's a shame, back to the drawing board I guess.

Carbon fibre next?

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2 minutes ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Oh, that's a shame, back to the drawing board I guess.

Carbon fibre next?

I think Carbon Fibre is a bit scary to work with isn't it?

I've been thinking about visiting some of the local junk shops with a view to re/up cycling unwanted furniture into gunstocks, either with large solid pieces or laminated thinner material. It seems that nobody wants dark wood furniture around here anyway and why not save something that is certainly well seasoned and aged. I'm no expert with wood but may see something that I like and probably cheap too

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11 minutes ago, impala59 said:

I think Carbon Fibre is a bit scary to work with isn't it?

I've been thinking about visiting some of the local junk shops with a view to re/up cycling unwanted furniture into gunstocks, either with large solid pieces or laminated thinner material. It seems that nobody wants dark wood furniture around here anyway and why not save something that is certainly well seasoned and aged. I'm no expert with wood but may see something that I like and probably cheap too

Thats an interesting idea, you would need pieces 14" X 5" X 2" and something other than the Harley to collect them.:good:

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13 minutes ago, TIGHTCHOKE said:

Thats an interesting idea, you would need pieces 14" X 5" X 2" and something other than the Harley to collect them.:good:

Large drawer fronts sprang to mind laminated to get the thickness or wardrobe sides/frames, bedrails, tabletops especially if incomplete for cheapness. Oh and the Mrs Bought me a pickup truck😁

 

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Lucky you, recycling old furniture would be great.

I look forward to any developments.:good:

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If I'm honest, I have to look up each type of wood on a picture chart to try to identify it. I probably wouldn't know yew if it jumped up and said Boo! Unlike many of the craftsmen on this forum I usually make it up as I go along, hence the Olive wood shenanigans. If it looks nice I guess I will try it (then ask for advice on here about how to do it properly😁)

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Watch out for sanding yew, wouldn't go as far as to say its toxic, but it aint good for you (most woods aren't that healthy tbh). Wear a mask

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