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Homemade butter


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It is really quite tasty! And actually rather easy to make.

First buy your cheap cream. Mine was 10p a big tub in the reduced section.

Back to the kitchen and pour into a nice big bowl, add salt to your desire taste (or not) and fire up the electric whisk.

You need to run it as fast as you can (without splattering everything) It will thicken and then stiffen, but you keep on a whiskin (No G) I had to keep switching it off to re-position the thick cream into the bowl. Try to whisk as much of it as you can. 

Basically you keep blasting it and it will start to leach the "butter milk" (watery milk) drain this and blast again and drain and blast etc until it stops leaching (not a technical term) a watery liquid called butter milk.

Once you have all the butter milk our your laughing. You can squeeze it to remove any excess butter milk (traditionally done with wooden paddles I believe) I think this helps with preservation however mine won't last long enough to worry about. 

It does seem to take a while and you will wonder if it's going to happen but it does!! Just keep on a whiskin well past the thick cream stage and it will happen! I hope :) 

Well that's how I do it! It's probably not perfect but it is rather tasty!! 

 

 

 

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Does that remind me of aching right arm.  My grandmother used to make almost all of our butter during and just after the war, late forties early fifties. Grandfather would bring high butter cream milk straight from the cow and tip into wide topped shallow pansions.  The cream would float to the top and I had to hold the bowl whilst she skimmed the cream off with a shallow scoop about 6 inches across which had drain holes which the cream wouldn't go through. Then into the kitchen and pour the cream into a butter churn. There was a big one, like a small wooden barrel, but she would use a glass one with a geared paddle arrangement turned by a handle at the side. My Job. Not too fast and not too slow and eventually it would 'turn' and small globules of butter would show on the inside of the glass container, then it was important to turn it just so and she would take over and eventually as described above it would all...

congeal, I suppose would fit.....pour off the whey and then out with the butter pats and base mold. The pats were wooden and ridged about 9 inches by 4 inches. The base had a cow engraved in the surface and the butter was pressed and patted until all signs of liquid was gone.  It would then be taken back down into the cold pantry and left to sit awhile, eventually turned onto a platter and the shape of the cow would then show on top.  Home made butter takes some beating, but better still straight from the cow.

Lampwick that looks superb, well done. 

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27 minutes ago, Walker570 said:

Does that remind me of aching right arm.  My grandmother used to make almost all of our butter during and just after the war, late forties early fifties. Grandfather would bring high butter cream milk straight from the cow and tip into wide topped shallow pansions.  The cream would float to the top and I had to hold the bowl whilst she skimmed the cream off with a shallow scoop about 6 inches across which had drain holes which the cream wouldn't go through. Then into the kitchen and pour the cream into a butter churn. There was a big one, like a small wooden barrel, but she would use a glass one with a geared paddle arrangement turned by a handle at the side. My Job. Not too fast and not too slow and eventually it would 'turn' and small globules of butter would show on the inside of the glass container, then it was important to turn it just so and she would take over and eventually as described above it would all...

congeal, I suppose would fit.....pour off the whey and then out with the butter pats and base mold. The pats were wooden and ridged about 9 inches by 4 inches. The base had a cow engraved in the surface and the butter was pressed and patted until all signs of liquid was gone.  It would then be taken back down into the cold pantry and left to sit awhile, eventually turned onto a platter and the shape of the cow would then show on top.  Home made butter takes some beating, but better still straight from the cow.

Lampwick that looks superb, well done. 

awesome post. 

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  • 5 weeks later...

That's exactly how I make mine .Put the cream in the food processor  wizz it on full power till the butters made . No more than 5 minutes from mx ing it pouring off the buttermilk to make soda bread then washing the butter with ice cold water and squeezing it to get all the buttermilk out then paddle and salt to taste .

Edited by steveshoots
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  • 1 month later...
On 10 April 2018 at 15:36, Scotty1980 said:

Just made a bit, it was dead easy! Thanks for that. 

20180410_145043.jpg

Looks good! Just remembered this thread and it reminded me I must keep an eye out for some more reduced cream. 

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Hi,

I grew upon a dairy farm.  We made butter once a week, and saved the cream in big pans .  It was getting a bit ripe by the end of the week, but turned into butter with the minimum of churning. , In Wales they liked plenty of salt in the butter, and the week-old  cream made the butter slightly translucent.

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  • 2 years later...
On 01/03/2018 at 16:19, Walker570 said:

Does that remind me of aching right arm.  My grandmother used to make almost all of our butter during and just after the war, late forties early fifties. Grandfather would bring high butter cream milk straight from the cow and tip into wide topped shallow pansions.  The cream would float to the top and I had to hold the bowl whilst she skimmed the cream off with a shallow scoop about 6 inches across which had drain holes which the cream wouldn't go through. Then into the kitchen and pour the cream into a butter churn. There was a big one, like a small wooden barrel, but she would use a glass one with a geared paddle arrangement turned by a handle at the side. My Job. Not too fast and not too slow and eventually it would 'turn' and small globules of butter would show on the inside of the glass container, then it was important to turn it just so and she would take over and eventually as described above it would all...

congeal, I suppose would fit.....pour off the whey and then out with the butter pats and base mold. The pats were wooden and ridged about 9 inches by 4 inches. The base had a cow engraved in the surface and the butter was pressed and patted until all signs of liquid was gone.  It would then be taken back down into the cold pantry and left to sit awhile, eventually turned onto a platter and the shape of the cow would then show on top.  Home made butter takes some beating, but better still straight from the cow.

Lampwick that looks superb, well done. 

Yes i.ve got my grandmothers 1 gallon glass butter churn like the one you said your grandmother had with the wooden paddles and geared hand kranked head 

lol same here i spent many a happy  hour turning that handle when I was a kid   

still enjoy giving it whirl now and again on occasion when cream is on offer lovely butter

they can still be bought on evilbay if you lucky they come in various shapes , sizes and prices plus a great piece of kitchen parafinelia people are intrigued when you tell them what it is used for 

Edited by hafod
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