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moondoggy

Power Tool Question

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I am looking at a new Bosch mitre saw and have been doing some research which includes prices.

The reason for the question is that the model of saw I am considering (Bosch GCM 12 GDL) is available in 240v and 110v.

1407712351_BoschGCM12GDL.png.9050f847b3fc8803b159b075423faeb6.png

The 110v version is approximately £100 cheaper from some suppliers.

I am only going to be using the saw at home, so site regulations do not apply.

I already have a 110v 3.3kVA transformer, which I was given to me by a builder who did some work for me.

Are there any advantages/disadvantages with 110v over 240v, other than the obvious one of having to lug the transformer around?

I have read that 110v tools have better motors, ie. more heavily wound armatures. Do anyone know if this is true?

Any help or advice is gratefully received as £100 is a lot of money.

Thank you in advance

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The only disadvantage to 110v is lugging a transformer around if you go anywhere else. But having said that if you ever need to go on site it is allowed. As you already have a transformer I would save the £100

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Saftey is a big factor if you get a shock its likely to only be 55 volts so alot better than 240 volts and as you already have a transformer I would go with the 110v option.

I use all 110v in my shed most industrial type equipment is more readily available. 

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31 minutes ago, Old melv said:

Saftey is a big factor if you get a shock its likely to only be 55 volts so alot better than 240 volts and as you already have a transformer I would go with the 110v option.

I use all 110v in my shed most industrial type equipment is more readily available. 

If your wiring is reasonably modern the 240v ring mains should be protected by a RCD or RCBO which trips within a fraction of second so 110v or 240v it makes little difference. I totally agree with you for site based applications where cables are at risk of damage and theres water all over the place. 110V CTE will give a max 55V shock which wont kill you. 

If you have a transformer and the 110v is cheaper go for that. 

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Changed all mine to 240v and cordless,got fed up with the transformer,now the 110v gear just sits there gathering dust.

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5 hours ago, moondoggy said:

I have read that 110v tools have better motors, ie. more heavily wound armatures. Do anyone know if this is true?

A 110v will be need about twice the current as a 230v motor to produce the same power, thus the size of the armature windings (cross sectional area) will have to be bigger.  However, I wouldn't expect this to be much of a factor; after all the tool will be equipped with a sufficient size motor in order to do the job (if it's a professional grade tool, at any rate....).  I can see this might be a benefit in a tool that gets a rough life on site, i.e. a drill that takes frequent trips to the floor, but honestly, cant see it being relevant in a mitre saw.

Personally, I'd think carefully before saving the £100, I tend to try and use my mitre saw as close to the job I'm doing as possible, and It's a heavy, awkward, lump to cart around.  The 110v transformer made of pig iron is hardly going to help matters in this regard.  However, if you're just at home in your shed/workshop and it'll never move, no brainer, might as well put the £100 towards more cartridges....

Since you (didnt) ask, I bought the Evolution Rage 255 in about 2010 and it's had 'heavy' DIY use when I was refurbing our house.  It's been great, and I do like the ability to cut metal as well, though the blades will wear out quicker.  It's probably not for fine woodworking, at least not with the supplied blade.  Am sure the Bosch is a step up in that regard.

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1 hour ago, SpringDon said:

Speaking as an ignoramus, isn’t the current twice as much with 110 and I was always told it was the current that kills you.

This. Exactly. 

And why 110 is actually more dangerous than the 240 version .

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Just now, Ultrastu said:

This. Exactly. 

And why 110 is actually more dangerous than the 240 version .

Not quite.

The tool itself will need twice the current for a given power output, that is however not related to how much will flow through you in any given situation.

If your argument is that the circuit (ring main, site transformer, whatever) is capable of delivering twice the current compared to a 230v, again that's not necessarily true.

Look up centre tapped earth transformers (CTE) and tell me what would you rather get a belt from, one of those at 55v or 230v?

Legislative considerations aside, 110v is going away anyway.  RCDs and RCBOs are standard fit these days (now required in domestic situations), and a lot of sites are going cordless only.

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after  many years in the construction industry where 110v was the  norm include generators paid running costs within price       nowadays battery tools are the norm     now retied I am with 240v on private jobs   a lot cheaper  and refurbs do  not  comply to hse so  different regs again 

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Sod 110v. From what I’ve heard, saws that are 110v suffer with power (not enough grunt) issues. Possibly not true on all brands but definitely the Festool kapex 120 in 110v has had lots of complaints. Depends on use I suppose. 

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Before you buy give Evolution a call - they sell ex demo machines about half the price of new ones - basically means they have been out of the box - some have actually been used or had minor faults that have been fixed - I've had 3 off them and they have all been as new - one had sawdust on the blade. Keep an eye on Aldi for blades - carbide tipped normally around £7 for 3 and they work just fine for me.

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12 hours ago, udderlyoffroad said:

Not quite.

The tool itself will need twice the current for a given power output, that is however not related to how much will flow through you in any given situation.

If your argument is that the circuit (ring main, site transformer, whatever) is capable of delivering twice the current compared to a 230v, again that's not necessarily true.

Look up centre tapped earth transformers (CTE) and tell me what would you rather get a belt from, one of those at 55v or 230v?

Legislative considerations aside, 110v is going away anyway.  RCDs and RCBOs are standard fit these days (now required in domestic situations), and a lot of sites are going cordless only.

 

Very true, we have three phase 10kva CTE transformers; our 110v secondary side are Belts and braces protected by 30Ma Rcds

People panic and don’t follow safety rules will get hurt on any voltages, used correctly you will be fine use stupidly its ya own fault

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On ‎15‎/‎03‎/‎2019 at 13:42, moondoggy said:

I am looking at a new Bosch mitre saw and have been doing some research which includes prices.

The reason for the question is that the model of saw I am considering (Bosch GCM 12 GDL) is available in 240v and 110v.

1407712351_BoschGCM12GDL.png.9050f847b3fc8803b159b075423faeb6.png

The 110v version is approximately £100 cheaper from some suppliers.

I am only going to be using the saw at home, so site regulations do not apply.

I already have a 110v 3.3kVA transformer, which I was given to me by a builder who did some work for me.

Are there any advantages/disadvantages with 110v over 240v, other than the obvious one of having to lug the transformer around?

I have read that 110v tools have better motors, ie. more heavily wound armatures. Do anyone know if this is true?

Any help or advice is gratefully received as £100 is a lot of money.

Thank you in advance

that's a nice saw, I was giving that some serious thought until dewalt brought out their new big flex volt saw so I got that instead, the only thing wrong with the bosch is the weight, it's one of the heaviest on the market, the new dewalt is lighter than the old dewalt, plus the added advantage of using either 110v, or 240v transformer packs, or batteries.

the only company I know of that ever had difficulties producing a 110v tool of any design was festool, I was in the market for a new 9" circular saw, took a look at the festool hk85 and the mafell k85, but both are only 240v, I tried the mafell saw just to see why it carried a 4 figure price tag and wasn't impressed, I have a 20+ year old 110v hilti that leaves both the other saws eating its dust.

back to the plot though, ive always picked 110v over 240v, whether it be a large or small site, 110v still seems to be the norm.

if you're only using it at home then park up your tranny near a plug and leave it there, just use a 110v lead if you need to move the saw about. 

Edited by Paddy Galore!

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Moondoggy,

I have the same saw, 240v & with the stand, a brilliant piece of kit. 😉

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