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How do people lug all there gear?


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Having been out of pigeon shooting for 20 years, and now after retirement,  re starting, I read about all this kit available, electric flappers, rotary magnets, batteries, remotes etc etc and wonder how the bloody hell do people lug all this stuff about? I thought I had a lot to carry when I only had 24 shell decoys , net ,poles carts,all in a 60 litre chemical drum , which was also your seat with rope shoulder straps I made!!!

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1 minute ago, pickerup said:

light weight wheelbarrow with puncture proof tyre from  bq

I dare say it is down to your level of fitness , age and how far you have got to lug your gear , I am over 70 and won't now lug all the gear over a good distance , if I can't drive close enough to where I intend to set up then I will take the minimum of gear , I used to take a barrow but you need a fairly big motor to get everything in including the dog and if you have had a good day then you need room for the days bag .

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Shank’s pony. I’m 35 though. My mate had a hernia op last year so one day I had to carry his gear and mine. A good 1km walk. Two trips there, three back. Three large batteries. A rotary, a flapper. 48 decoys. 4 nets. Hide poles. Two slabs of cartridges. Two chairs (a wooden stool and a wooden dining chair). One gun (he carried his own), some bottles of water for the heat and a spot of lunch. On the way back had to add almost a hundred pigeon to that. His photos of it were great but I was not in the mood to laugh on the way back as I was late home and in trouble with the wife too. 

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Range Rover to drive to spot and unload. Then I can take everything including the kitchen sink.

If its less than 50m or so, fishing barrow with extra large pump up tyre. Folds flat for transportation. Scraper welded in for light mud.

More than 50m either my son carries it all except my gun, or if on my own I just put out a half dozen half shells (sometimes nothing if on a good flight line) and take a begara seat, maybe hang a net from the trees. Never more than I can lift easily on a couple of fingers. 

My guide is two ex army rocket pouches which must contain everything but gun and stool, but include extra warm kit, food, drink and my essential meds and first aid kit.

Once you get used to it, its surprising how much stuff you don't need to have a reasonably good day.

 

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I started with a fishing box bolted to a luggage trolley, this was ok but was a bit flimsy , so I rebuilt it with a stronger frame, 2 wheel barrow wheels and a swivel seat on top of the box, worked well for the time I used it but old age got the better of me, so I bought a Suzuki 4x4 Vitara 2 door, lots of room in the back with the seats down for my huge amount of gear, the estate I shoot on has green lane and headlands around much of the land, so I can now drive to almost all the places where I can shoot, even in the winter through the mud, if I get too cold I can sit in the car for a quick warm up and a coffee before resuming the testing work, oh yes - good times.

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Home made magnets that only use hypa flap decoys, the arms are carbon fibre and the 2 machines weigh less that 1 wiper motor variety. The poles and bases for these machines are made from childs aluminium stilts. Shell decoys, plastic barrel seat, lightweight nets, Pinewood hide poles. All fits into a folding wheelbarrow and good to go. I am nearly 4 score years  !

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The gear soon mounts up. You can manage with very little but to be honest it is nice to have all the toys with you at times. I have just bought a rotary which is quite weighty. Got me flapper as well which light enough. But at times with every thing I was struggling to walk in as it was so it might be time for a barrow or some thing.
Heading mid fifties my self and not too bad fitness wise but its still a slog at times. Nice to also see the older generation still lugging stuff about. Reassuring lol   

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On 25/02/2021 at 22:06, WalkedUp said:

Shank’s pony. I’m 35 though. My mate had a hernia op last year so one day I had to carry his gear and mine. A good 1km walk. Two trips there, three back. Three large batteries. A rotary, a flapper. 48 decoys. 4 nets. Hide poles. Two slabs of cartridges. Two chairs (a wooden stool and a wooden dining chair). One gun (he carried his own), some bottles of water for the heat and a spot of lunch. On the way back had to add almost a hundred pigeon to that. His photos of it were great but I was not in the mood to laugh on the way back as I was late home and in trouble with the wife too. 

Blimey, stamina doesn`t even cover it. :hmm:

OB

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 28/02/2021 at 17:29, Centrepin said:

If you try a barrow, I use one of these, changed the wheel for a pump up barrow wheel.  Cost around £50. Folds flat, and takes apart.

 

20210228_172200.jpg

I have the same barrow, which does get tough to push in mud - do you have a link to the wheel you replaced it with?  Thanks!

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I usually walk with all of my kit. It is a pain but I use the exercise as part of my keeping fit regime.

If the prospects look good I am mentally more prepared for the long slog.

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2 hours ago, Trenta said:

I have the same barrow, which does get tough to push in mud - do you have a link to the wheel you replaced it with?  Thanks!

Sorry, I just took one off a knackered barrow, pushed in a repaired inner tube and it fitted.

Generally builders barrows, especially ground workers wear the barrows out before the tread even shows wear.

I also removed the sides and contain everything with a couple of bungees.

The heavier it is, the harder to push through mud. I always try taking the minimum. 

Edited by Centrepin
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  • 3 weeks later...

Me personally if I can’t carry it in one trip I’ve got too much. Done the hard slog like a pack mule enough times to have learned it just sickens you more when it’s not a brilliant day and it’s at the back of your mind knowing you have to lug it all back plus Birds. I much prefer the Spartan approach. Get set up quick enjoy the sport, pack up and move spots if needed and can get back to the car easy when I’ve had enough. Might not be as effective but  I sure prefer to have a relaxed 20 bird day than a 100 bird day that requires planed logistics 

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An angler's plastic Shakespeare seat box. Before than an NHS Tote Box. Or a converted golfer's trolley bought from a charity shop for £6.50. The gun in a slip over my shoulder and the poles I carry lashed into a bundle to make a "staff" in my free hand as a walking aid.

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